The effect of drama activities on speech production in children with dysarthria: a survey of parental perceptions

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Abstract

Taking part in performing arts activities that include vocal activities such as group singing, and drama classes can have psychosocial benefits (Barnish & Barran, 2020). Recent evidence suggests that there are potential therapeutic benefits of such activities for adults with dysarthria (e.g. Abell et al., 2017; Fogg-Rogers et al., 2016). However, there is limited knowledge on whether children with dysarthria might equally benefit from vocal performing arts activities. This report is based on a project that aimed to determine whether children with dysarthria benefit from drama classes in a similar way as adults. For this purpose, a survey was developed and distributed to parents, whose children have dysarthria and participate in drama workshops offered by a small charity in Scotland. Parental reports showed that their children benefit from these activities, not just in terms of psychosocial development such as self-confidence, but also in terms of greater clarity of speech as well as increased communication participation in social contexts.
Original languageEnglish
Place of PublicationGlasgow
PublisherUniversity of Strathclyde
Number of pages7
Publication statusPublished - 30 Nov 2022

Keywords

  • drama activities
  • speech production
  • children
  • dysarthria
  • parental perceptions

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