The effect of anticoagulants on the distribution of chromium VI in blood fractions relevance to patients with metal orthopedic implants

G. Afolaranmi, J.N.A. Tettey, H.M. Murray, R.M.D. Meek, M.H. Grant

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Metal-on-metal resurfacing arthroplasty is associated with elevated circulating levels of cobalt and chromium ions. To establish the long-term safety of metal-on-metal resurfacing arthroplasty, it has been recommended that during clinical follow-up of these patients, the levels of these metal ions in blood be monitored. In this article, we provide information on the distribution of chromium VI ions (the predominant form of chromium released by cobalt-chrome alloys in vivo and in vitro) in blood fractions. Chromium VI is predominantly partitioned into red blood cells compared with plasma (analysis of variance, P < .05). The extent of accumulation in red blood cells is influenced by the anticoagulant used to collect the blood, with EDTA giving a lower partitioning into red cells compared with sodium citrate and sodium heparin.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)118-120
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Arthroplasty
Volume25
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Fingerprint

Anticoagulants
Orthopedics
Metals
Chromium
Ions
Cobalt
Arthroplasty
Erythrocytes
Information Dissemination
Edetic Acid
Heparin
Analysis of Variance
chromium hexavalent ion
Safety

Keywords

  • hexavalent chromium
  • orthopedic implants
  • distribution in blood
  • anticoagulant
  • plasma
  • red blood cells

Cite this

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The effect of anticoagulants on the distribution of chromium VI in blood fractions relevance to patients with metal orthopedic implants. / Afolaranmi, G.; Tettey, J.N.A.; Murray, H.M.; Meek, R.M.D.; Grant, M.H.

In: Journal of Arthroplasty, Vol. 25, No. 1, 2010, p. 118-120.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Afolaranmi, G.

AU - Tettey, J.N.A.

AU - Murray, H.M.

AU - Meek, R.M.D.

AU - Grant, M.H.

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