The economic and environmental impact of a carbon tax for Scotland: a computable general equilibrium analysis

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Abstract

Using a disaggregated energy–economy–environmental model, we investigate the economic and environmental impact of a Scottish specific carbon tax under three alternative assumptions about the use of the revenue raised by the tax: revenues raised are not recycled within Scotland; revenues are used to increase general government expenditure or to reduce Scottish income tax. Wefind that by imposing a tax of £50 per tonne of CO2 the 37% CO2 reduction target is met with a very rapid adjustment in all three cases if the model incorporates forward-looking behaviour. However, the adjustment is much slower if agents are myopic. In addition, the results of the model suggest that a carbon tax might simultaneously stimulate economic activity whilst reducing emissions and thus secure a double dividend, but only for the case in which the revenue is recycled through income tax.
LanguageEnglish
Pages40-50
Number of pages11
JournalEcological Economics
Volume100
Early online date18 Feb 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2014

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pollution tax
computable general equilibrium analysis
economic impact
environmental impact
public spending
economic activity
energy
Revenue
Carbon tax
Environmental impact
General equilibrium analysis
Computable general equilibrium
Economic impact
Scotland
tax
income tax
Co2
Income tax

Keywords

  • carbon tax
  • computable general equilibrium
  • environmental impact

Cite this

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abstract = "Using a disaggregated energy–economy–environmental model, we investigate the economic and environmental impact of a Scottish specific carbon tax under three alternative assumptions about the use of the revenue raised by the tax: revenues raised are not recycled within Scotland; revenues are used to increase general government expenditure or to reduce Scottish income tax. Wefind that by imposing a tax of £50 per tonne of CO2 the 37{\%} CO2 reduction target is met with a very rapid adjustment in all three cases if the model incorporates forward-looking behaviour. However, the adjustment is much slower if agents are myopic. In addition, the results of the model suggest that a carbon tax might simultaneously stimulate economic activity whilst reducing emissions and thus secure a double dividend, but only for the case in which the revenue is recycled through income tax.",
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AB - Using a disaggregated energy–economy–environmental model, we investigate the economic and environmental impact of a Scottish specific carbon tax under three alternative assumptions about the use of the revenue raised by the tax: revenues raised are not recycled within Scotland; revenues are used to increase general government expenditure or to reduce Scottish income tax. Wefind that by imposing a tax of £50 per tonne of CO2 the 37% CO2 reduction target is met with a very rapid adjustment in all three cases if the model incorporates forward-looking behaviour. However, the adjustment is much slower if agents are myopic. In addition, the results of the model suggest that a carbon tax might simultaneously stimulate economic activity whilst reducing emissions and thus secure a double dividend, but only for the case in which the revenue is recycled through income tax.

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