The ecology of peer relations

Barbara Kelly

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The study of peer relations has arrived at an interesting point both conceptually and in terms of current evidence. In reviewing research with a particular focus on links between family experience and peer competence, it is clear that a sophisticated ecology is emerging. Research in this area is wide‐ranging and innovative, reflecting and defining issues which have relevance to the study of many aspects of child development. A number of key areas which involve new conceptualisations and directions are identified—for example, relationships, bidirectionality and the notion of dynamic genotype/phenotype interaction. Advances in peer research begin to address an increasing demand for collaborative exploration of processes amongst developmentalists, environmentalists and geneticists.
LanguageEnglish
Pages99-114
Number of pages16
JournalEarly Childhood Development and Care
Volume115
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1996

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Ecology
Research
Child Development
Mental Competency
Genotype
Phenotype

Keywords

  • peer relationships
  • ecology
  • educational psychology

Cite this

Kelly, Barbara. / The ecology of peer relations. In: Early Childhood Development and Care. 1996 ; Vol. 115, No. 1. pp. 99-114.
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The ecology of peer relations. / Kelly, Barbara.

In: Early Childhood Development and Care, Vol. 115, No. 1, 1996, p. 99-114.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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KW - educational psychology

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