The dog, the home and the human, and the ancestry of Derrida's cat

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

There are many stories, told by philosophers, historians, poets, about dogs, those loyal companions of our moments of recreation. In these stories, which are often played out in the most familiar locations, the absence of the dog is a mark of disorder, its presence order, and thus we find ourselves, in these tales we tell, at home, at peace – with dogs. Indeed, the stories told about dogs, we might argue, are never really about dogs at all, they are always about humans. These are stories that tell of a desire for completion – for self-knowledge, self-possession,
security and stability – but which also have the potential to record – in the dog’s death or disappearance – the fragility of such self-knowledge, self-possession, security and stability.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)37-54
Number of pages18
JournalOxford Literary Review
Volume29
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2007

Fingerprint

possession
recreation
historian
peace
writer
death
Jacques Derrida
Ancestry
Dog

Keywords

  • dogs
  • cats
  • history of animals
  • human
  • philosophy

Cite this

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The dog, the home and the human, and the ancestry of Derrida's cat. / Fudge, Erica.

In: Oxford Literary Review, Vol. 29, No. 1-2, 07.2007, p. 37-54.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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