The development, rationale, organisation and future management of public sector tourism in Scotland

A. Frew, Brian Hay, Cliff Lockyer (Editor)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Scotland is a small country, part of a small island on the edge of Western Europe, yet it has a very large tourist organisation (with about 750 staff) relative to other countries - how can this be? Scotland is different from the rest of the UK; it has its own education system, separate judicial and legal systems, and these, along with the Church, have helped to mould Scotland’s identity. Scotland is not an independent state so does not have direct membership of the United Nation nor its affiliated organisations. In 1999, the UK government devolved limited authority and power to the new Scottish Parliament, including judicial authority, education, health and industrial development – including tourism. Scotland, with a population of just over five million, has always looked outwards and innovation has long been part of Scottish culture. So can Scotland also take a lead in developing a new management structure for delivering tourism in Scotland in the 21st century?
LanguageEnglish
Pages62-76
Number of pages15
JournalFraser of Allander Economic Commentary
Volume34
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2011

Fingerprint

Tourism
Public sector
Rationale
Scotland
Authority
Management structure
Innovation
Small countries
Legal system
Industrial development
Parliament
Tourists
Government
Staff
Education system
Health education
United Nations

Keywords

  • Scottish tourism
  • Scottish economy

Cite this

Frew, A. ; Hay, Brian ; Lockyer, Cliff (Editor). / The development, rationale, organisation and future management of public sector tourism in Scotland. In: Fraser of Allander Economic Commentary. 2011 ; Vol. 34, No. 3. pp. 62-76.
@article{8a5a0815fd8d49fe94b26cc3138493a7,
title = "The development, rationale, organisation and future management of public sector tourism in Scotland",
abstract = "Scotland is a small country, part of a small island on the edge of Western Europe, yet it has a very large tourist organisation (with about 750 staff) relative to other countries - how can this be? Scotland is different from the rest of the UK; it has its own education system, separate judicial and legal systems, and these, along with the Church, have helped to mould Scotland’s identity. Scotland is not an independent state so does not have direct membership of the United Nation nor its affiliated organisations. In 1999, the UK government devolved limited authority and power to the new Scottish Parliament, including judicial authority, education, health and industrial development – including tourism. Scotland, with a population of just over five million, has always looked outwards and innovation has long been part of Scottish culture. So can Scotland also take a lead in developing a new management structure for delivering tourism in Scotland in the 21st century?",
keywords = "Scottish tourism, Scottish economy",
author = "A. Frew and Brian Hay and Cliff Lockyer",
year = "2011",
month = "3",
language = "English",
volume = "34",
pages = "62--76",
journal = "Fraser of Allander Economic Commentary",
issn = "2046-5378",
publisher = "University of Strathclyde",
number = "3",

}

The development, rationale, organisation and future management of public sector tourism in Scotland. / Frew, A.; Hay, Brian; Lockyer, Cliff (Editor).

In: Fraser of Allander Economic Commentary, Vol. 34, No. 3, 03.2011, p. 62-76.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The development, rationale, organisation and future management of public sector tourism in Scotland

AU - Frew, A.

AU - Hay, Brian

A2 - Lockyer, Cliff

PY - 2011/3

Y1 - 2011/3

N2 - Scotland is a small country, part of a small island on the edge of Western Europe, yet it has a very large tourist organisation (with about 750 staff) relative to other countries - how can this be? Scotland is different from the rest of the UK; it has its own education system, separate judicial and legal systems, and these, along with the Church, have helped to mould Scotland’s identity. Scotland is not an independent state so does not have direct membership of the United Nation nor its affiliated organisations. In 1999, the UK government devolved limited authority and power to the new Scottish Parliament, including judicial authority, education, health and industrial development – including tourism. Scotland, with a population of just over five million, has always looked outwards and innovation has long been part of Scottish culture. So can Scotland also take a lead in developing a new management structure for delivering tourism in Scotland in the 21st century?

AB - Scotland is a small country, part of a small island on the edge of Western Europe, yet it has a very large tourist organisation (with about 750 staff) relative to other countries - how can this be? Scotland is different from the rest of the UK; it has its own education system, separate judicial and legal systems, and these, along with the Church, have helped to mould Scotland’s identity. Scotland is not an independent state so does not have direct membership of the United Nation nor its affiliated organisations. In 1999, the UK government devolved limited authority and power to the new Scottish Parliament, including judicial authority, education, health and industrial development – including tourism. Scotland, with a population of just over five million, has always looked outwards and innovation has long been part of Scottish culture. So can Scotland also take a lead in developing a new management structure for delivering tourism in Scotland in the 21st century?

KW - Scottish tourism

KW - Scottish economy

UR - http://www.strath.ac.uk/frasercommentary/

UR - http://www.strath.ac.uk/fraser/

M3 - Article

VL - 34

SP - 62

EP - 76

JO - Fraser of Allander Economic Commentary

T2 - Fraser of Allander Economic Commentary

JF - Fraser of Allander Economic Commentary

SN - 2046-5378

IS - 3

ER -