The chemical and biological properties of propolis

Weam Siheri, Sameah Alenezi, Jonans Tusiimire, David G. Watson

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The term propolis comes from two Greek words, pro (which means for or in defence of) and polis (which means the city); thus, propolis means in defence of the city or beehive. Propolis is a sticky resinous substance, which is gathered from buds and the bark of trees. It is also known as "bee glue" as bees use it to cover surfaces, seal holes and close gaps in their hives, thus providing a sterile environment that protects them from microbes and spore-producing organisms, including fungi and molds. It can be considered to be a potent chemical weapon against bacteria, viruses, and other pathogenic microorganisms that may invade the bee colony. Also, bees use propolis as an embalming substance, to mummify invaders such as other insects, that have been killed and are too heavy to remove from the colony. Thus, propolis is important for bee health but it also has activity against many human diseases. It is a powerful anti-oxidant and can modulate the activity of reactive oxygen species within the human body. The most studied aspect of propolis is its anti-bacterial activity, which is almost always present at a moderate to high level depending on the exact type of propolis. It is in general more active against Gram positive than Gram negative bacteria, but activity against Gram negative bacteria has been observed. Propolis has been found to be active against a range of viruses and also is almost always active against protozoa such as Tryanosoma brucei and Leishmania donovani. Propolis also shows activity against cardiovascular diseases and diabetes and has immunomodulatory effects. Anti-cancer activity has also been observed. In summary, propolis is remarkable for its range of biological activities and for the variety of its chemical composition. It may be of great importance both to bees and humans.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationBee Products - Chemical and Biological Properties
EditorsJosé M Alvarez-Suarez
Place of PublicationCham
Pages137-178
Number of pages42
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 5 Sep 2017

Fingerprint

Propolis
Bees
Bacteria
Gram-Negative Bacteria
Viruses
Embalming
Fungi
Plant Bark
Protozoa
Leishmania donovani
Weapons
Urticaria
Molds
Medical problems
Bioactivity
Spores
Human Body
Oxidants
Microorganisms
Seals

Keywords

  • propolis
  • antioxidant properties
  • antimicrobial activity
  • antiviral activity
  • antiprotozoal and antihelmithic activity
  • antifungal properties

Cite this

Siheri, W., Alenezi, S., Tusiimire, J., & Watson, D. G. (2017). The chemical and biological properties of propolis. In J. M. Alvarez-Suarez (Ed.), Bee Products - Chemical and Biological Properties (pp. 137-178). Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-59689-1_7
Siheri, Weam ; Alenezi, Sameah ; Tusiimire, Jonans ; Watson, David G. / The chemical and biological properties of propolis. Bee Products - Chemical and Biological Properties. editor / José M Alvarez-Suarez. Cham, 2017. pp. 137-178
@inbook{b91fb5c1212d42a39b6ddf99a362872a,
title = "The chemical and biological properties of propolis",
abstract = "The term propolis comes from two Greek words, pro (which means for or in defence of) and polis (which means the city); thus, propolis means in defence of the city or beehive. Propolis is a sticky resinous substance, which is gathered from buds and the bark of trees. It is also known as {"}bee glue{"} as bees use it to cover surfaces, seal holes and close gaps in their hives, thus providing a sterile environment that protects them from microbes and spore-producing organisms, including fungi and molds. It can be considered to be a potent chemical weapon against bacteria, viruses, and other pathogenic microorganisms that may invade the bee colony. Also, bees use propolis as an embalming substance, to mummify invaders such as other insects, that have been killed and are too heavy to remove from the colony. Thus, propolis is important for bee health but it also has activity against many human diseases. It is a powerful anti-oxidant and can modulate the activity of reactive oxygen species within the human body. The most studied aspect of propolis is its anti-bacterial activity, which is almost always present at a moderate to high level depending on the exact type of propolis. It is in general more active against Gram positive than Gram negative bacteria, but activity against Gram negative bacteria has been observed. Propolis has been found to be active against a range of viruses and also is almost always active against protozoa such as Tryanosoma brucei and Leishmania donovani. Propolis also shows activity against cardiovascular diseases and diabetes and has immunomodulatory effects. Anti-cancer activity has also been observed. In summary, propolis is remarkable for its range of biological activities and for the variety of its chemical composition. It may be of great importance both to bees and humans.",
keywords = "propolis, antioxidant properties, antimicrobial activity, antiviral activity, antiprotozoal and antihelmithic activity, antifungal properties",
author = "Weam Siheri and Sameah Alenezi and Jonans Tusiimire and Watson, {David G.}",
year = "2017",
month = "9",
day = "5",
doi = "10.1007/978-3-319-59689-1_7",
language = "English",
isbn = "9783319596884",
pages = "137--178",
editor = "Alvarez-Suarez, {Jos{\'e} M}",
booktitle = "Bee Products - Chemical and Biological Properties",

}

Siheri, W, Alenezi, S, Tusiimire, J & Watson, DG 2017, The chemical and biological properties of propolis. in JM Alvarez-Suarez (ed.), Bee Products - Chemical and Biological Properties. Cham, pp. 137-178. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-59689-1_7

The chemical and biological properties of propolis. / Siheri, Weam; Alenezi, Sameah; Tusiimire, Jonans; Watson, David G.

Bee Products - Chemical and Biological Properties. ed. / José M Alvarez-Suarez. Cham, 2017. p. 137-178.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

TY - CHAP

T1 - The chemical and biological properties of propolis

AU - Siheri, Weam

AU - Alenezi, Sameah

AU - Tusiimire, Jonans

AU - Watson, David G.

PY - 2017/9/5

Y1 - 2017/9/5

N2 - The term propolis comes from two Greek words, pro (which means for or in defence of) and polis (which means the city); thus, propolis means in defence of the city or beehive. Propolis is a sticky resinous substance, which is gathered from buds and the bark of trees. It is also known as "bee glue" as bees use it to cover surfaces, seal holes and close gaps in their hives, thus providing a sterile environment that protects them from microbes and spore-producing organisms, including fungi and molds. It can be considered to be a potent chemical weapon against bacteria, viruses, and other pathogenic microorganisms that may invade the bee colony. Also, bees use propolis as an embalming substance, to mummify invaders such as other insects, that have been killed and are too heavy to remove from the colony. Thus, propolis is important for bee health but it also has activity against many human diseases. It is a powerful anti-oxidant and can modulate the activity of reactive oxygen species within the human body. The most studied aspect of propolis is its anti-bacterial activity, which is almost always present at a moderate to high level depending on the exact type of propolis. It is in general more active against Gram positive than Gram negative bacteria, but activity against Gram negative bacteria has been observed. Propolis has been found to be active against a range of viruses and also is almost always active against protozoa such as Tryanosoma brucei and Leishmania donovani. Propolis also shows activity against cardiovascular diseases and diabetes and has immunomodulatory effects. Anti-cancer activity has also been observed. In summary, propolis is remarkable for its range of biological activities and for the variety of its chemical composition. It may be of great importance both to bees and humans.

AB - The term propolis comes from two Greek words, pro (which means for or in defence of) and polis (which means the city); thus, propolis means in defence of the city or beehive. Propolis is a sticky resinous substance, which is gathered from buds and the bark of trees. It is also known as "bee glue" as bees use it to cover surfaces, seal holes and close gaps in their hives, thus providing a sterile environment that protects them from microbes and spore-producing organisms, including fungi and molds. It can be considered to be a potent chemical weapon against bacteria, viruses, and other pathogenic microorganisms that may invade the bee colony. Also, bees use propolis as an embalming substance, to mummify invaders such as other insects, that have been killed and are too heavy to remove from the colony. Thus, propolis is important for bee health but it also has activity against many human diseases. It is a powerful anti-oxidant and can modulate the activity of reactive oxygen species within the human body. The most studied aspect of propolis is its anti-bacterial activity, which is almost always present at a moderate to high level depending on the exact type of propolis. It is in general more active against Gram positive than Gram negative bacteria, but activity against Gram negative bacteria has been observed. Propolis has been found to be active against a range of viruses and also is almost always active against protozoa such as Tryanosoma brucei and Leishmania donovani. Propolis also shows activity against cardiovascular diseases and diabetes and has immunomodulatory effects. Anti-cancer activity has also been observed. In summary, propolis is remarkable for its range of biological activities and for the variety of its chemical composition. It may be of great importance both to bees and humans.

KW - propolis

KW - antioxidant properties

KW - antimicrobial activity

KW - antiviral activity

KW - antiprotozoal and antihelmithic activity

KW - antifungal properties

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85035100101&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/978-3-319-59689-1_7

DO - 10.1007/978-3-319-59689-1_7

M3 - Chapter

SN - 9783319596884

SP - 137

EP - 178

BT - Bee Products - Chemical and Biological Properties

A2 - Alvarez-Suarez, José M

CY - Cham

ER -

Siheri W, Alenezi S, Tusiimire J, Watson DG. The chemical and biological properties of propolis. In Alvarez-Suarez JM, editor, Bee Products - Chemical and Biological Properties. Cham. 2017. p. 137-178 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-59689-1_7