The annual labour force survey and unemployment rates - calculating with confidence

Patrick Watt, Adrian Green, Brian Ashcroft (Editor), Eleanor Malloy (Editor), Sarah Le Tissier (Editor)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The recent review by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) of the presentation and dissemination of labour market statistics has resulted in a greater prominence being given to the results of the Labour Force Survey (LFS) than was previously the case. In particular, in the official measurement of unemployment, a greater focus is now given to LFS results. There is an involved (and on-going) debate about the measurement of unemployment in the UK and a brief indication of some suggested references is appended to this paper. One central issue in the debate on the measurement of unemployment in the UK has been the relative accuracy of estimates from the LFS. This short paper contributes to this debate by estimating the margins of error associated with unemployment rates sourced from the Annual LFS Local Authority database for 1996, using the Ayrshire area as an example.
LanguageEnglish
Pages52-57
Number of pages6
JournalQuarterly Economic Commentary
Volume23
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1998

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Confidence
Labor force
Unemployment rate
Unemployment
Statistics
Labour market
Data base
Margin
Dissemination
Local authorities

Keywords

  • Scottish labour market trends
  • Scotland
  • unemployment patterns
  • Scottish economy

Cite this

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The annual labour force survey and unemployment rates - calculating with confidence. / Watt, Patrick; Green, Adrian; Ashcroft, Brian (Editor); Malloy, Eleanor (Editor); Le Tissier, Sarah (Editor).

In: Quarterly Economic Commentary, Vol. 23, No. 4, 09.1998, p. 52-57.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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