Testing integrated electric vehicle charging and domestic heating strategies for future UK housing

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Abstract

A building simulation tool and customised electric vehicle (EV) charging algorithm was used to investigate the impact of electrified home heating coupled with EV charging on the electrical demand characteristics of a future, net-zero-energy UK dwelling. A range of strategies by which EV charging and electrified heating could be controlled in order to minimise household peak demands were tested including off-peak load shifting, fast and slow vehicle charging, demand limited charging and heating, and bi-directional battery operation. The simulation results indicate that in all cases, electrical energy use was more than doubled compared to a base case with no EV or electric heating. The peak demand also increased substantially. The most effective strategy to limit peak demand, whilst also minimising the impact on end user comfort and EV availability, was to control the heat pump operation and vehicle charging using a demand limit, this restricted the rise in absolute peak demand to 46% above that of the base case. Off-peak load shifting proved ineffective at reducing absolute peak demands and resulted in increased discomfort in the house. Peak limiting of EV charging proved a more useful load management mechanism than allowing the vehicle battery to discharge.
LanguageEnglish
Pages377-392
Number of pages16
JournalEnergy and Buildings
Volume105
Early online date23 Jul 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Oct 2015

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Electric Vehicle
Electric vehicles
Heating
Testing
Battery
Electric heating
Simulation Tool
Energy
Pump
Demand
Strategy
Availability
Limiting
Heat
Pumps
Minimise
Zero
Range of data
Simulation

Keywords

  • electric vehicle
  • heat pump
  • zero energy dwelling
  • electrical demand
  • simulation

Cite this

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title = "Testing integrated electric vehicle charging and domestic heating strategies for future UK housing",
abstract = "A building simulation tool and customised electric vehicle (EV) charging algorithm was used to investigate the impact of electrified home heating coupled with EV charging on the electrical demand characteristics of a future, net-zero-energy UK dwelling. A range of strategies by which EV charging and electrified heating could be controlled in order to minimise household peak demands were tested including off-peak load shifting, fast and slow vehicle charging, demand limited charging and heating, and bi-directional battery operation. The simulation results indicate that in all cases, electrical energy use was more than doubled compared to a base case with no EV or electric heating. The peak demand also increased substantially. The most effective strategy to limit peak demand, whilst also minimising the impact on end user comfort and EV availability, was to control the heat pump operation and vehicle charging using a demand limit, this restricted the rise in absolute peak demand to 46{\%} above that of the base case. Off-peak load shifting proved ineffective at reducing absolute peak demands and resulted in increased discomfort in the house. Peak limiting of EV charging proved a more useful load management mechanism than allowing the vehicle battery to discharge.",
keywords = "electric vehicle, heat pump, zero energy dwelling, electrical demand, simulation",
author = "Nicolas Kelly and Aizaz Samuel and Jon Hand",
year = "2015",
month = "10",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1016/j.enbuild.2015.07.044",
language = "English",
volume = "105",
pages = "377--392",
journal = "Energy and Buildings",
issn = "0378-7788",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",

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T1 - Testing integrated electric vehicle charging and domestic heating strategies for future UK housing

AU - Kelly, Nicolas

AU - Samuel, Aizaz

AU - Hand, Jon

PY - 2015/10/15

Y1 - 2015/10/15

N2 - A building simulation tool and customised electric vehicle (EV) charging algorithm was used to investigate the impact of electrified home heating coupled with EV charging on the electrical demand characteristics of a future, net-zero-energy UK dwelling. A range of strategies by which EV charging and electrified heating could be controlled in order to minimise household peak demands were tested including off-peak load shifting, fast and slow vehicle charging, demand limited charging and heating, and bi-directional battery operation. The simulation results indicate that in all cases, electrical energy use was more than doubled compared to a base case with no EV or electric heating. The peak demand also increased substantially. The most effective strategy to limit peak demand, whilst also minimising the impact on end user comfort and EV availability, was to control the heat pump operation and vehicle charging using a demand limit, this restricted the rise in absolute peak demand to 46% above that of the base case. Off-peak load shifting proved ineffective at reducing absolute peak demands and resulted in increased discomfort in the house. Peak limiting of EV charging proved a more useful load management mechanism than allowing the vehicle battery to discharge.

AB - A building simulation tool and customised electric vehicle (EV) charging algorithm was used to investigate the impact of electrified home heating coupled with EV charging on the electrical demand characteristics of a future, net-zero-energy UK dwelling. A range of strategies by which EV charging and electrified heating could be controlled in order to minimise household peak demands were tested including off-peak load shifting, fast and slow vehicle charging, demand limited charging and heating, and bi-directional battery operation. The simulation results indicate that in all cases, electrical energy use was more than doubled compared to a base case with no EV or electric heating. The peak demand also increased substantially. The most effective strategy to limit peak demand, whilst also minimising the impact on end user comfort and EV availability, was to control the heat pump operation and vehicle charging using a demand limit, this restricted the rise in absolute peak demand to 46% above that of the base case. Off-peak load shifting proved ineffective at reducing absolute peak demands and resulted in increased discomfort in the house. Peak limiting of EV charging proved a more useful load management mechanism than allowing the vehicle battery to discharge.

KW - electric vehicle

KW - heat pump

KW - zero energy dwelling

KW - electrical demand

KW - simulation

UR - https://www.sciencedirect.com/journal/energy-and-buildings

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DO - 10.1016/j.enbuild.2015.07.044

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SP - 377

EP - 392

JO - Energy and Buildings

T2 - Energy and Buildings

JF - Energy and Buildings

SN - 0378-7788

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