Teaching research in qualifying social work: capacity and challenge

Gillian MacIntyre, Elaine Sharland, Sally Paul

    Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

    Abstract

    This paper presents a preliminary report of an audit of the current state of research methods teaching in UK qualifying social work education. The audit is part of a wider ESRC funded study to provide baseline data for setting progress objectives towards building research capacity in the discipline and profession. The place and purpose of research teaching in social work education is strongly contested. Less contestable, however, is the lack of attention to research in qualifying social work curricula in all four UK countries, despite their differing prescribed curricula but common adherence to the QAA Benchmark Statement and the National Occupational Standards. The marginalisation of research teaching is underlined by the paucity of UK literature on the topic, compared with American and other writing. Reasons for this range from lack of time, staff skill and resource, to more fundamental reservations and resistance on the part of educators, students and practitioners towards engaging with research. At the heart of such ambivalence lies fundamental debate about the nature of the social work discipline, and the relationship between research and practice. Before we may tackle the task of building research capacity, we must better understand existing education practices and the challenges for research teaching faced. This paper offers preliminary observations from the audit, based on a survey of undergraduate and masters qualifying social work programmes across all four countries, with in-depth enquiry into a smaller sample from each. The survey examines what research methods are taught, how, where, when and by whom. Most importantly, it considers why these choices are made, and the challenges and possibilities presented for building research capacity and research mindedness at qualifying level.

    Conference

    Conference10th UK Joint Social Work Education Conference with the 2nd UK Social Work Research Conference
    CityCambridge, UK
    Period9/07/0811/07/08

    Fingerprint

    teaching research
    social work
    audit
    research method
    curriculum
    education
    lack
    ambivalence
    profession
    educator
    staff
    Teaching
    resources

    Keywords

    • social work
    • teaching
    • teaching research
    • social work education

    Cite this

    MacIntyre, G., Sharland, E., & Paul, S. (2008). Teaching research in qualifying social work: capacity and challenge. Paper presented at 10th UK Joint Social Work Education Conference with the 2nd UK Social Work Research Conference, Cambridge, UK, .
    MacIntyre, Gillian ; Sharland, Elaine ; Paul, Sally. / Teaching research in qualifying social work: capacity and challenge. Paper presented at 10th UK Joint Social Work Education Conference with the 2nd UK Social Work Research Conference, Cambridge, UK, .
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    author = "Gillian MacIntyre and Elaine Sharland and Sally Paul",
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    MacIntyre, G, Sharland, E & Paul, S 2008, 'Teaching research in qualifying social work: capacity and challenge' Paper presented at 10th UK Joint Social Work Education Conference with the 2nd UK Social Work Research Conference, Cambridge, UK, 9/07/08 - 11/07/08, .

    Teaching research in qualifying social work: capacity and challenge. / MacIntyre, Gillian; Sharland, Elaine; Paul, Sally.

    2008. Paper presented at 10th UK Joint Social Work Education Conference with the 2nd UK Social Work Research Conference, Cambridge, UK, .

    Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

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    AU - Sharland, Elaine

    AU - Paul, Sally

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    MacIntyre G, Sharland E, Paul S. Teaching research in qualifying social work: capacity and challenge. 2008. Paper presented at 10th UK Joint Social Work Education Conference with the 2nd UK Social Work Research Conference, Cambridge, UK, .