Teacher and child talk in active learning and whole-class contexts: some implications for children from economically less advantaged home backgrounds

J. Martlew, S. Ellis, C. Stephen, J Ellis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper reports the experiences of 150 children and six primary teachers when active learning pedagogies were introduced into the first year of primary schools. Although active learning increased the amount of talk between children, those from socio-economically advantaged homes talked more than those from less advantaged homes. Also, individual children experienced very little time engaged in high-quality talk with the teacher, despite the teachers spending over one-third of their time responding to children's needs and interests. Contextual differences, such as the different staffing ratios in schools and pre-schools,may affect how well the benefits of active learning transfer from preschool contexts into primary schools. Policy-makers and teachers should pay particular attention to the implications of this for the education of children from economically less advantaged home backgrounds.
LanguageEnglish
Pages12-19
Number of pages8
JournalLiteracy
Volume44
Issue number1
Early online date22 Mar 2010
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2010

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teacher
learning
primary school
school
Active Learning
education
experience
time
Primary School
Education
Politicians
Teacher Talk
Contextual

Keywords

  • active learning
  • play
  • talk
  • pedagogy
  • EarlyYears
  • language curriculum
  • socio-economic status

Cite this

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Teacher and child talk in active learning and whole-class contexts : some implications for children from economically less advantaged home backgrounds. / Martlew, J.; Ellis, S.; Stephen, C.; Ellis, J.

In: Literacy, Vol. 44, No. 1, 04.2010, p. 12-19.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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