Talking to children about death, dying and palliative care: an action research approach to developing practice between hospices and primary schools in Scotland

    Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

    Abstract

    Aim: This presentation discusses a PhD study exploring how hospices can effectively engage with primary schools to involve children in conversation and education on death, dying and palliative care. It will outline the context of the study, the research process and the practice examples developed, discussing their significance to health promoting palliative care (HPPC).
    Background: Community engagement in end of life care issues has gained increased policy and practice recognition concerning its contribution to meaningful end of life care. In Scotland, engaging with schools to equip children with skills and knowledge to cope with death and bereavement has been emphasized (Scottish Government 2010). Hospices have been argued as well situated to promote such activities due to their expertise in end of life care (Salau, et al. 2007).
    Methodology: An action research approach was employed with two primary schools in Scotland. Participants included children aged 9 – 11 years, parents, teachers and hospice staff. It aimed to increase knowledge, experience and understanding of current practice relating to death education and engage in a process of change (Winter and Munn-Giddings 2001).
    Findings and Recommendations:
    Three practice suggestions were identified by participants as key ways forward to improve practice. These can be understood alongside HPPC principles as outlined by Kellehear (2005). They are currently in the process of being initiated, necessitating reorientation of service delivery across both school and hospice settings.
    Conclusion:
    The action research process highlights the significance of community engagement and ownership in developing practice. The significance of sharing and transferring knowledge and expertise across service providers is identified.

    Conference

    Conference3rd International Public Health and Palliative Care Conference
    CountryIreland
    CityLimerick
    Period25/03/1327/03/13
    Internet address

    Fingerprint

    hospice
    research approach
    dying
    action research
    primary school
    death
    research process
    expertise
    health
    school
    service provider
    community
    education
    parents
    conversation
    staff
    methodology
    teacher
    experience

    Keywords

    • palliative care
    • death
    • dying
    • coping with bereavement
    • children

    Cite this

    Paul, S. (2013). Talking to children about death, dying and palliative care: an action research approach to developing practice between hospices and primary schools in Scotland. Paper presented at 3rd International Public Health and Palliative Care Conference, Limerick, Ireland.
    @conference{04a19f45041c4bc69f39c6452d57ae45,
    title = "Talking to children about death, dying and palliative care: an action research approach to developing practice between hospices and primary schools in Scotland",
    abstract = "Aim: This presentation discusses a PhD study exploring how hospices can effectively engage with primary schools to involve children in conversation and education on death, dying and palliative care. It will outline the context of the study, the research process and the practice examples developed, discussing their significance to health promoting palliative care (HPPC).Background: Community engagement in end of life care issues has gained increased policy and practice recognition concerning its contribution to meaningful end of life care. In Scotland, engaging with schools to equip children with skills and knowledge to cope with death and bereavement has been emphasized (Scottish Government 2010). Hospices have been argued as well situated to promote such activities due to their expertise in end of life care (Salau, et al. 2007). Methodology: An action research approach was employed with two primary schools in Scotland. Participants included children aged 9 – 11 years, parents, teachers and hospice staff. It aimed to increase knowledge, experience and understanding of current practice relating to death education and engage in a process of change (Winter and Munn-Giddings 2001).Findings and Recommendations:Three practice suggestions were identified by participants as key ways forward to improve practice. These can be understood alongside HPPC principles as outlined by Kellehear (2005). They are currently in the process of being initiated, necessitating reorientation of service delivery across both school and hospice settings. Conclusion:The action research process highlights the significance of community engagement and ownership in developing practice. The significance of sharing and transferring knowledge and expertise across service providers is identified.",
    keywords = "palliative care, death, dying, coping with bereavement, children",
    author = "Sally Paul",
    year = "2013",
    month = "3",
    day = "25",
    language = "English",
    note = "3rd International Public Health and Palliative Care Conference : Death, dying, loss and care: social experiences of medical events? ; Conference date: 25-03-2013 Through 27-03-2013",
    url = "http://www.phpci.info/phpc13/",

    }

    Paul, S 2013, 'Talking to children about death, dying and palliative care: an action research approach to developing practice between hospices and primary schools in Scotland' Paper presented at 3rd International Public Health and Palliative Care Conference, Limerick, Ireland, 25/03/13 - 27/03/13, .

    Talking to children about death, dying and palliative care : an action research approach to developing practice between hospices and primary schools in Scotland. / Paul, Sally.

    2013. Paper presented at 3rd International Public Health and Palliative Care Conference, Limerick, Ireland.

    Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

    TY - CONF

    T1 - Talking to children about death, dying and palliative care

    T2 - an action research approach to developing practice between hospices and primary schools in Scotland

    AU - Paul, Sally

    PY - 2013/3/25

    Y1 - 2013/3/25

    N2 - Aim: This presentation discusses a PhD study exploring how hospices can effectively engage with primary schools to involve children in conversation and education on death, dying and palliative care. It will outline the context of the study, the research process and the practice examples developed, discussing their significance to health promoting palliative care (HPPC).Background: Community engagement in end of life care issues has gained increased policy and practice recognition concerning its contribution to meaningful end of life care. In Scotland, engaging with schools to equip children with skills and knowledge to cope with death and bereavement has been emphasized (Scottish Government 2010). Hospices have been argued as well situated to promote such activities due to their expertise in end of life care (Salau, et al. 2007). Methodology: An action research approach was employed with two primary schools in Scotland. Participants included children aged 9 – 11 years, parents, teachers and hospice staff. It aimed to increase knowledge, experience and understanding of current practice relating to death education and engage in a process of change (Winter and Munn-Giddings 2001).Findings and Recommendations:Three practice suggestions were identified by participants as key ways forward to improve practice. These can be understood alongside HPPC principles as outlined by Kellehear (2005). They are currently in the process of being initiated, necessitating reorientation of service delivery across both school and hospice settings. Conclusion:The action research process highlights the significance of community engagement and ownership in developing practice. The significance of sharing and transferring knowledge and expertise across service providers is identified.

    AB - Aim: This presentation discusses a PhD study exploring how hospices can effectively engage with primary schools to involve children in conversation and education on death, dying and palliative care. It will outline the context of the study, the research process and the practice examples developed, discussing their significance to health promoting palliative care (HPPC).Background: Community engagement in end of life care issues has gained increased policy and practice recognition concerning its contribution to meaningful end of life care. In Scotland, engaging with schools to equip children with skills and knowledge to cope with death and bereavement has been emphasized (Scottish Government 2010). Hospices have been argued as well situated to promote such activities due to their expertise in end of life care (Salau, et al. 2007). Methodology: An action research approach was employed with two primary schools in Scotland. Participants included children aged 9 – 11 years, parents, teachers and hospice staff. It aimed to increase knowledge, experience and understanding of current practice relating to death education and engage in a process of change (Winter and Munn-Giddings 2001).Findings and Recommendations:Three practice suggestions were identified by participants as key ways forward to improve practice. These can be understood alongside HPPC principles as outlined by Kellehear (2005). They are currently in the process of being initiated, necessitating reorientation of service delivery across both school and hospice settings. Conclusion:The action research process highlights the significance of community engagement and ownership in developing practice. The significance of sharing and transferring knowledge and expertise across service providers is identified.

    KW - palliative care

    KW - death

    KW - dying

    KW - coping with bereavement

    KW - children

    UR - http://www.phpci.info/

    M3 - Paper

    ER -

    Paul S. Talking to children about death, dying and palliative care: an action research approach to developing practice between hospices and primary schools in Scotland. 2013. Paper presented at 3rd International Public Health and Palliative Care Conference, Limerick, Ireland.