Taking part: social movements, INGOs and global change

Catherine Eschle, Neil Stammers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Can social movements make a difference in global politics? That question is, ultimately, one that only the historical practice of transnational social movements will answer. But is that answer likely to be heard or understood by analysts, even if it were to ring in the air around them? We think not, unless there is a fundamental shift in the way the transformative agency of social movements is conceptualized. In this article we try to substantiate this claim through a critique of existing approaches to the study of transnational social movements. We argue that the attention given to transnational social movements across several different academic disciplines has failed to generate the intellectual and disciplinary synthesis needed to understand their potential. On the contrary, the limitations of each discipline have simply been replicated by others, leaving the field cluttered with incommensurable or overlapping analyses, concepts, and jargon.
LanguageEnglish
Pages333-372
Number of pages40
JournalAlternatives
Volume29
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2004

Fingerprint

global change
Social Movements
air
politics

Keywords

  • globalisation
  • global politics
  • transnational social movements

Cite this

Eschle, Catherine ; Stammers, Neil. / Taking part: social movements, INGOs and global change. In: Alternatives. 2004 ; Vol. 29, No. 3. pp. 333-372.
@article{5c6e9583dd224fadbf3832a035cb9db9,
title = "Taking part: social movements, INGOs and global change",
abstract = "Can social movements make a difference in global politics? That question is, ultimately, one that only the historical practice of transnational social movements will answer. But is that answer likely to be heard or understood by analysts, even if it were to ring in the air around them? We think not, unless there is a fundamental shift in the way the transformative agency of social movements is conceptualized. In this article we try to substantiate this claim through a critique of existing approaches to the study of transnational social movements. We argue that the attention given to transnational social movements across several different academic disciplines has failed to generate the intellectual and disciplinary synthesis needed to understand their potential. On the contrary, the limitations of each discipline have simply been replicated by others, leaving the field cluttered with incommensurable or overlapping analyses, concepts, and jargon.",
keywords = "globalisation, global politics, transnational social movements",
author = "Catherine Eschle and Neil Stammers",
year = "2004",
month = "6",
language = "English",
volume = "29",
pages = "333--372",
journal = "Alternatives",
issn = "0304-3754",
number = "3",

}

Eschle, C & Stammers, N 2004, 'Taking part: social movements, INGOs and global change' Alternatives, vol. 29, no. 3, pp. 333-372.

Taking part: social movements, INGOs and global change. / Eschle, Catherine; Stammers, Neil.

In: Alternatives, Vol. 29, No. 3, 06.2004, p. 333-372.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Taking part: social movements, INGOs and global change

AU - Eschle, Catherine

AU - Stammers, Neil

PY - 2004/6

Y1 - 2004/6

N2 - Can social movements make a difference in global politics? That question is, ultimately, one that only the historical practice of transnational social movements will answer. But is that answer likely to be heard or understood by analysts, even if it were to ring in the air around them? We think not, unless there is a fundamental shift in the way the transformative agency of social movements is conceptualized. In this article we try to substantiate this claim through a critique of existing approaches to the study of transnational social movements. We argue that the attention given to transnational social movements across several different academic disciplines has failed to generate the intellectual and disciplinary synthesis needed to understand their potential. On the contrary, the limitations of each discipline have simply been replicated by others, leaving the field cluttered with incommensurable or overlapping analyses, concepts, and jargon.

AB - Can social movements make a difference in global politics? That question is, ultimately, one that only the historical practice of transnational social movements will answer. But is that answer likely to be heard or understood by analysts, even if it were to ring in the air around them? We think not, unless there is a fundamental shift in the way the transformative agency of social movements is conceptualized. In this article we try to substantiate this claim through a critique of existing approaches to the study of transnational social movements. We argue that the attention given to transnational social movements across several different academic disciplines has failed to generate the intellectual and disciplinary synthesis needed to understand their potential. On the contrary, the limitations of each discipline have simply been replicated by others, leaving the field cluttered with incommensurable or overlapping analyses, concepts, and jargon.

KW - globalisation

KW - global politics

KW - transnational social movements

UR - http://www.questia.com/googleScholar.qst;jsessionid=MsRYRh1gJ5Y17tGNnGZLG0h8vj2TWJ3LNkC8QBhTvXZNQWL2LYt1!427202863!1380883283?docId=5008305886

M3 - Article

VL - 29

SP - 333

EP - 372

JO - Alternatives

T2 - Alternatives

JF - Alternatives

SN - 0304-3754

IS - 3

ER -