Systematic review of post-treatment psychosocial and behaviour change interventions for men with cancer

Hannah Dale, Pauline Adair, Gerald Humphris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The psychosocial impacts of a cancer diagnosis include reduced quality of life, poorer inter-personal relationships, hopelessness and mental illness. Worse outcomes, including mortality rates have been found for single men with cancer compared with women and partnered men. The aim of this systematic review was to examine the effectiveness of post-treatment psychosocial and behaviour change interventions for adult men with cancer, in order to inform the development of an intervention. A focus on single men was intended. Ten databases were searched via Ovid and Web of Science. Papers were systematically extracted by title, abstract and full paper according to the inclusion/exclusion criteria. Full papers were assessed by two authors. Inclusion criteria: participants at any stage of a cancer diagnosis, ⩾50% male and aged 18+; psychosocial and/or behavioural post-treatment interventions, using any format; a one–three level of evidence. Couple/carer/family interventions were excluded. From 9948 studies initially identified, 11 were finally included in the review. They implemented cognitive behaviour therapy, hypnosis or psychoeducational interventions. All studies had some positive results, however, lack of reporting of intervention content and methodological issues limit the findings. No studies intervened with single men, and none provided comparative outcomes for marital status. Effectiveness of interventions was difficult to assess as, while all had benefits, their generalisability was limited due to methodological and reporting limitations. Improved reporting procedures are required to allow for replication.
LanguageEnglish
Pages227-237
Number of pages11
JournalPsycho-Oncology
Volume19
Issue number3
Early online date9 Jul 2009
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2010

Fingerprint

Neoplasms
Therapeutics
Hypnosis
Marital Status
Cognitive Therapy
Caregivers
Quality of Life
Databases
Mortality

Keywords

  • cancer
  • oncology
  • men
  • interventions
  • review

Cite this

Dale, Hannah ; Adair, Pauline ; Humphris, Gerald . / Systematic review of post-treatment psychosocial and behaviour change interventions for men with cancer. In: Psycho-Oncology. 2010 ; Vol. 19, No. 3. pp. 227-237.
@article{d0e3b3e7dffd4c10b53016a81dd03558,
title = "Systematic review of post-treatment psychosocial and behaviour change interventions for men with cancer",
abstract = "The psychosocial impacts of a cancer diagnosis include reduced quality of life, poorer inter-personal relationships, hopelessness and mental illness. Worse outcomes, including mortality rates have been found for single men with cancer compared with women and partnered men. The aim of this systematic review was to examine the effectiveness of post-treatment psychosocial and behaviour change interventions for adult men with cancer, in order to inform the development of an intervention. A focus on single men was intended. Ten databases were searched via Ovid and Web of Science. Papers were systematically extracted by title, abstract and full paper according to the inclusion/exclusion criteria. Full papers were assessed by two authors. Inclusion criteria: participants at any stage of a cancer diagnosis, ⩾50{\%} male and aged 18+; psychosocial and/or behavioural post-treatment interventions, using any format; a one–three level of evidence. Couple/carer/family interventions were excluded. From 9948 studies initially identified, 11 were finally included in the review. They implemented cognitive behaviour therapy, hypnosis or psychoeducational interventions. All studies had some positive results, however, lack of reporting of intervention content and methodological issues limit the findings. No studies intervened with single men, and none provided comparative outcomes for marital status. Effectiveness of interventions was difficult to assess as, while all had benefits, their generalisability was limited due to methodological and reporting limitations. Improved reporting procedures are required to allow for replication.",
keywords = "cancer, oncology, men, interventions, review",
author = "Hannah Dale and Pauline Adair and Gerald Humphris",
year = "2010",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1002/pon.1598",
language = "English",
volume = "19",
pages = "227--237",
journal = "Psycho-Oncology",
issn = "1057-9249",
number = "3",

}

Systematic review of post-treatment psychosocial and behaviour change interventions for men with cancer. / Dale, Hannah; Adair, Pauline; Humphris, Gerald .

In: Psycho-Oncology, Vol. 19, No. 3, 03.2010, p. 227-237.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Systematic review of post-treatment psychosocial and behaviour change interventions for men with cancer

AU - Dale, Hannah

AU - Adair, Pauline

AU - Humphris, Gerald

PY - 2010/3

Y1 - 2010/3

N2 - The psychosocial impacts of a cancer diagnosis include reduced quality of life, poorer inter-personal relationships, hopelessness and mental illness. Worse outcomes, including mortality rates have been found for single men with cancer compared with women and partnered men. The aim of this systematic review was to examine the effectiveness of post-treatment psychosocial and behaviour change interventions for adult men with cancer, in order to inform the development of an intervention. A focus on single men was intended. Ten databases were searched via Ovid and Web of Science. Papers were systematically extracted by title, abstract and full paper according to the inclusion/exclusion criteria. Full papers were assessed by two authors. Inclusion criteria: participants at any stage of a cancer diagnosis, ⩾50% male and aged 18+; psychosocial and/or behavioural post-treatment interventions, using any format; a one–three level of evidence. Couple/carer/family interventions were excluded. From 9948 studies initially identified, 11 were finally included in the review. They implemented cognitive behaviour therapy, hypnosis or psychoeducational interventions. All studies had some positive results, however, lack of reporting of intervention content and methodological issues limit the findings. No studies intervened with single men, and none provided comparative outcomes for marital status. Effectiveness of interventions was difficult to assess as, while all had benefits, their generalisability was limited due to methodological and reporting limitations. Improved reporting procedures are required to allow for replication.

AB - The psychosocial impacts of a cancer diagnosis include reduced quality of life, poorer inter-personal relationships, hopelessness and mental illness. Worse outcomes, including mortality rates have been found for single men with cancer compared with women and partnered men. The aim of this systematic review was to examine the effectiveness of post-treatment psychosocial and behaviour change interventions for adult men with cancer, in order to inform the development of an intervention. A focus on single men was intended. Ten databases were searched via Ovid and Web of Science. Papers were systematically extracted by title, abstract and full paper according to the inclusion/exclusion criteria. Full papers were assessed by two authors. Inclusion criteria: participants at any stage of a cancer diagnosis, ⩾50% male and aged 18+; psychosocial and/or behavioural post-treatment interventions, using any format; a one–three level of evidence. Couple/carer/family interventions were excluded. From 9948 studies initially identified, 11 were finally included in the review. They implemented cognitive behaviour therapy, hypnosis or psychoeducational interventions. All studies had some positive results, however, lack of reporting of intervention content and methodological issues limit the findings. No studies intervened with single men, and none provided comparative outcomes for marital status. Effectiveness of interventions was difficult to assess as, while all had benefits, their generalisability was limited due to methodological and reporting limitations. Improved reporting procedures are required to allow for replication.

KW - cancer

KW - oncology

KW - men

KW - interventions

KW - review

U2 - 10.1002/pon.1598

DO - 10.1002/pon.1598

M3 - Article

VL - 19

SP - 227

EP - 237

JO - Psycho-Oncology

T2 - Psycho-Oncology

JF - Psycho-Oncology

SN - 1057-9249

IS - 3

ER -