Sun-synchronous highly elliptical orbits using low-thrust propulsion

Pamela Anderson, Malcolm Macdonald

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Due to restrictions within the current architecture of the global observing system (GOS), space-based remote sensing of Earth suffers from an acute data-deficit over the critical polar-regions. Currently, observation of high-latitude regions is conducted using composite images from spacecraft in geostationary (GEO) and low-Earth orbits (LEOs) [1]. However, the oblique viewing geometry from GEO-based systems to latitudes above around 55 deg [2] and the insufficient temporal resolution of spacecraft in LEO means there is currently no source of continuous imagery for polar-regions obtained with a data refresh rate of less than 15 minutes, as is typically available elsewhere for meteorological observations.
LanguageEnglish
Pages1849-1855
JournalJournal of Guidance, Control and Dynamics
Volume36
Issue number6
Early online date21 Dec 2012
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2013

Fingerprint

low thrust propulsion
elliptical orbits
Sun
polar regions
Propulsion
sun
Orbits
thrust
Orbit
Earth (planet)
low Earth orbits
polar region
Spacecraft
spacecraft
Oblique
temporal resolution
imagery
Acute
Remote Sensing
remote sensing

Keywords

  • elliptical orbit
  • low-thrust propulsion
  • sun-synchronous orbit

Cite this

@article{19751fb929dd4beab58235ec498587db,
title = "Sun-synchronous highly elliptical orbits using low-thrust propulsion",
abstract = "Due to restrictions within the current architecture of the global observing system (GOS), space-based remote sensing of Earth suffers from an acute data-deficit over the critical polar-regions. Currently, observation of high-latitude regions is conducted using composite images from spacecraft in geostationary (GEO) and low-Earth orbits (LEOs) [1]. However, the oblique viewing geometry from GEO-based systems to latitudes above around 55 deg [2] and the insufficient temporal resolution of spacecraft in LEO means there is currently no source of continuous imagery for polar-regions obtained with a data refresh rate of less than 15 minutes, as is typically available elsewhere for meteorological observations.",
keywords = "elliptical orbit, low-thrust propulsion, sun-synchronous orbit",
author = "Pamela Anderson and Malcolm Macdonald",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} 2012 by Pamela Anderson. Published by the American Institute of AeronauticsandAstronautics,Inc.,withpermission.Copiesofthispapermay be made for personal or internal use, on condition that the copier pay the $10.00 per-copy fee to the Copyright Clearance Center, Inc., 222 Rosewood Drive, Danvers, MA 01923; include the code 1533-3884/13 and $10.00 in correspondence with the CCC.",
year = "2013",
month = "11",
doi = "10.2514/1.59848",
language = "English",
volume = "36",
pages = "1849--1855",
journal = "Journal of Guidance, Control and Dynamics",
issn = "0731-5090",
number = "6",

}

Sun-synchronous highly elliptical orbits using low-thrust propulsion. / Anderson, Pamela; Macdonald, Malcolm.

In: Journal of Guidance, Control and Dynamics, Vol. 36, No. 6, 11.2013, p. 1849-1855.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Sun-synchronous highly elliptical orbits using low-thrust propulsion

AU - Anderson, Pamela

AU - Macdonald, Malcolm

N1 - Copyright © 2012 by Pamela Anderson. Published by the American Institute of AeronauticsandAstronautics,Inc.,withpermission.Copiesofthispapermay be made for personal or internal use, on condition that the copier pay the $10.00 per-copy fee to the Copyright Clearance Center, Inc., 222 Rosewood Drive, Danvers, MA 01923; include the code 1533-3884/13 and $10.00 in correspondence with the CCC.

PY - 2013/11

Y1 - 2013/11

N2 - Due to restrictions within the current architecture of the global observing system (GOS), space-based remote sensing of Earth suffers from an acute data-deficit over the critical polar-regions. Currently, observation of high-latitude regions is conducted using composite images from spacecraft in geostationary (GEO) and low-Earth orbits (LEOs) [1]. However, the oblique viewing geometry from GEO-based systems to latitudes above around 55 deg [2] and the insufficient temporal resolution of spacecraft in LEO means there is currently no source of continuous imagery for polar-regions obtained with a data refresh rate of less than 15 minutes, as is typically available elsewhere for meteorological observations.

AB - Due to restrictions within the current architecture of the global observing system (GOS), space-based remote sensing of Earth suffers from an acute data-deficit over the critical polar-regions. Currently, observation of high-latitude regions is conducted using composite images from spacecraft in geostationary (GEO) and low-Earth orbits (LEOs) [1]. However, the oblique viewing geometry from GEO-based systems to latitudes above around 55 deg [2] and the insufficient temporal resolution of spacecraft in LEO means there is currently no source of continuous imagery for polar-regions obtained with a data refresh rate of less than 15 minutes, as is typically available elsewhere for meteorological observations.

KW - elliptical orbit

KW - low-thrust propulsion

KW - sun-synchronous orbit

UR - http://arc.aiaa.org/doi/pdf/10.2514/1.59848

U2 - 10.2514/1.59848

DO - 10.2514/1.59848

M3 - Article

VL - 36

SP - 1849

EP - 1855

JO - Journal of Guidance, Control and Dynamics

T2 - Journal of Guidance, Control and Dynamics

JF - Journal of Guidance, Control and Dynamics

SN - 0731-5090

IS - 6

ER -