Suicide ideation and alcohol use: understanding developmental trajectories

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

1 Citation (Scopus)
11 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The absence of longitudinal data relating to experiences of victimization is a perennial problem in adolescent research. Few studies offer the opportunity to explore the developmental trajectories leading to suicidal ideation and suicide attempts. Although numerous cross-sectional studies have reported that substance abuse (including alcohol consumption) is a significant correlate of suicide and other life-threatening behaviors among youth who have experienced victimization [1], we do not yet fully understand how alcohol is linked to suicide ideation. Is alcohol consumption a precursor to a suicidal act or has it more a distinct role to play in the lives of young people who are daily tormented by others? We know, for example, that a significant number of those youths (aged 15–19 years) who take their own lives and do not have a history of mental illness or psychiatric care have high levels of alcohol in their blood (17.1%) and no history of alcohol dependence (3.3%). This is even more evident among 20- to 24-year-olds, where one study found that 43.8% of suicides had alcohol present in their blood, but only 9.4% had any recorded history of alcohol dependence [2].
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)357
Number of pages1
JournalJournal of Adolescent Health
Volume60
Issue number4
Early online date21 Mar 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2017

Fingerprint

Suicide
Alcohols
Crime Victims
Alcohol Drinking
Alcoholism
Suicidal Ideation
Substance-Related Disorders
Psychiatry
Cross-Sectional Studies
Research

Keywords

  • suicide ideation
  • victimization
  • alcohol use
  • adolescents
  • secondary mental disorders
  • bidirectional associations

Cite this

@article{2dbe0a4d0e114692b637a37d2c917b30,
title = "Suicide ideation and alcohol use: understanding developmental trajectories",
abstract = "The absence of longitudinal data relating to experiences of victimization is a perennial problem in adolescent research. Few studies offer the opportunity to explore the developmental trajectories leading to suicidal ideation and suicide attempts. Although numerous cross-sectional studies have reported that substance abuse (including alcohol consumption) is a significant correlate of suicide and other life-threatening behaviors among youth who have experienced victimization [1], we do not yet fully understand how alcohol is linked to suicide ideation. Is alcohol consumption a precursor to a suicidal act or has it more a distinct role to play in the lives of young people who are daily tormented by others? We know, for example, that a significant number of those youths (aged 15–19 years) who take their own lives and do not have a history of mental illness or psychiatric care have high levels of alcohol in their blood (17.1{\%}) and no history of alcohol dependence (3.3{\%}). This is even more evident among 20- to 24-year-olds, where one study found that 43.8{\%} of suicides had alcohol present in their blood, but only 9.4{\%} had any recorded history of alcohol dependence [2].",
keywords = "suicide ideation, victimization, alcohol use, adolescents, secondary mental disorders, bidirectional associations",
author = "Ian Rivers",
year = "2017",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jadohealth.2017.01.013",
language = "English",
volume = "60",
pages = "357",
journal = "Journal of Adolescent Health",
issn = "1054-139X",
number = "4",

}

Suicide ideation and alcohol use : understanding developmental trajectories. / Rivers, Ian.

In: Journal of Adolescent Health, Vol. 60, No. 4, 01.04.2017, p. 357.

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

TY - JOUR

T1 - Suicide ideation and alcohol use

T2 - understanding developmental trajectories

AU - Rivers, Ian

PY - 2017/4/1

Y1 - 2017/4/1

N2 - The absence of longitudinal data relating to experiences of victimization is a perennial problem in adolescent research. Few studies offer the opportunity to explore the developmental trajectories leading to suicidal ideation and suicide attempts. Although numerous cross-sectional studies have reported that substance abuse (including alcohol consumption) is a significant correlate of suicide and other life-threatening behaviors among youth who have experienced victimization [1], we do not yet fully understand how alcohol is linked to suicide ideation. Is alcohol consumption a precursor to a suicidal act or has it more a distinct role to play in the lives of young people who are daily tormented by others? We know, for example, that a significant number of those youths (aged 15–19 years) who take their own lives and do not have a history of mental illness or psychiatric care have high levels of alcohol in their blood (17.1%) and no history of alcohol dependence (3.3%). This is even more evident among 20- to 24-year-olds, where one study found that 43.8% of suicides had alcohol present in their blood, but only 9.4% had any recorded history of alcohol dependence [2].

AB - The absence of longitudinal data relating to experiences of victimization is a perennial problem in adolescent research. Few studies offer the opportunity to explore the developmental trajectories leading to suicidal ideation and suicide attempts. Although numerous cross-sectional studies have reported that substance abuse (including alcohol consumption) is a significant correlate of suicide and other life-threatening behaviors among youth who have experienced victimization [1], we do not yet fully understand how alcohol is linked to suicide ideation. Is alcohol consumption a precursor to a suicidal act or has it more a distinct role to play in the lives of young people who are daily tormented by others? We know, for example, that a significant number of those youths (aged 15–19 years) who take their own lives and do not have a history of mental illness or psychiatric care have high levels of alcohol in their blood (17.1%) and no history of alcohol dependence (3.3%). This is even more evident among 20- to 24-year-olds, where one study found that 43.8% of suicides had alcohol present in their blood, but only 9.4% had any recorded history of alcohol dependence [2].

KW - suicide ideation

KW - victimization

KW - alcohol use

KW - adolescents

KW - secondary mental disorders

KW - bidirectional associations

UR - http://www.jahonline.org/

UR - http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/1054139X

U2 - 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2017.01.013

DO - 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2017.01.013

M3 - Editorial

VL - 60

SP - 357

JO - Journal of Adolescent Health

JF - Journal of Adolescent Health

SN - 1054-139X

IS - 4

ER -