Suggested visual hallucination without hypnosis enhances activity in visual areas of the brain

William J. McGeown, Annalena Venneri, Irving Kirsch, Luca Nocetti, Kathrine Roberts, Lisa Foan, Giuliana Mazzoni

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) study investigated high and low suggestible people responding to two visual hallucination suggestions with and without a hypnotic induction. Participants in the study were asked to see color while looking at a grey image, and to see shades of grey while looking at a color image. High suggestible participants reported successful alterations in color perception in both tasks, both in and out of hypnosis, and showed a small benefit if hypnosis was induced. Low suggestible people could not perform the tasks successfully with or without the hypnotic induction. The fMRI results supported the self report data, and changes in brain activity were found in a number of visual areas. The results indicate that a hypnotic induction, although having the potential to enhance the ability of high suggestible people, is not necessary for the effective alteration of color perception by suggestion.

LanguageEnglish
Pages100-116
Number of pages17
JournalConsciousness and Cognition
Volume21
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2012

Fingerprint

Hypnosis
Hallucinations
Hypnotics and Sedatives
Color Perception
Brain
Color
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Aptitude
Self Report

Keywords

  • responsiveness
  • perception
  • cortex
  • altered state
  • color
  • brain imaging
  • positron emission tomography
  • suggestibility
  • hypnosis
  • colour

Cite this

McGeown, William J. ; Venneri, Annalena ; Kirsch, Irving ; Nocetti, Luca ; Roberts, Kathrine ; Foan, Lisa ; Mazzoni, Giuliana. / Suggested visual hallucination without hypnosis enhances activity in visual areas of the brain. In: Consciousness and Cognition. 2012 ; Vol. 21, No. 1. pp. 100-116.
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Suggested visual hallucination without hypnosis enhances activity in visual areas of the brain. / McGeown, William J.; Venneri, Annalena; Kirsch, Irving; Nocetti, Luca; Roberts, Kathrine; Foan, Lisa; Mazzoni, Giuliana.

In: Consciousness and Cognition, Vol. 21, No. 1, 03.2012, p. 100-116.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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