Structure-property relationships in glass-reinforced polyamide, Part 3: Effects of hydrolysis ageing on the dimensional stability and performance of short glass-fiber-reinforced polyamide 66

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Abstract

We present results on an in-depth study of the effects of hydrolysis testing on the mechanical performance, weight change, and dimensional stability of injection moulded glass-fibre reinforced polyamide 66 based on two chopped fibre products with different sizing formulations. Composite and resin samples have been characterised both dry as moulded and after conditioning at either 120°C or 150°C for a range of times up to 1000 hours. The results reveal that hydrothermal ageing in water-glycol mixtures results in significant changes in the mechanical performance, weight, and dimensions of these materials. The negative effects of conditioning could be mitigated to some degree by the appropriate choice of the glass fibre sizing; however the sizing effect diminished with increasing conditioning time. All materials showed a weight increase due to conditioning at 120°C which was typical of a single Fickian diffusion process and there was clear evidence of multiple processes involved when conditioning at 150°C. It was not apparent that the glass fibre sizing affected the dimensional stability of the composites. We show that there is a strong correlation between the swelling of these samples and the level of fluid adsorption. Although the PA66 resin showed reasonably homogeneous swelling, the composites exhibited different levels of swelling depending on direction. These effects were well in line with the known effects of fibres on restriction of the matrix deformation (mechanical, thermal or moisture swelling) in the fibre direction. These differences correlate well with the average fibre orientation with respect to the various direction axes. Composite tensile strength and unnotched impact resistance appeared to scale inversely with the level of swelling of the material.
LanguageEnglish
Pages344-354
Number of pages10
JournalPolymer Composites
Volume28
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2007

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Dimensional stability
Nylons
Polyamides
Glass fibers
Swelling
Hydrolysis
Aging of materials
Glass
Composite materials
Fibers
Resins
Glycols
Impact resistance
Composite Resins
Fiber reinforced materials
Tensile strength
Moisture
fiberglass
Adsorption
Fluids

Keywords

  • polymer composites
  • materials science
  • structure-property relationships
  • glass
  • hydrolysis ageing
  • stability
  • polyamide

Cite this

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title = "Structure-property relationships in glass-reinforced polyamide, Part 3: Effects of hydrolysis ageing on the dimensional stability and performance of short glass-fiber-reinforced polyamide 66",
abstract = "We present results on an in-depth study of the effects of hydrolysis testing on the mechanical performance, weight change, and dimensional stability of injection moulded glass-fibre reinforced polyamide 66 based on two chopped fibre products with different sizing formulations. Composite and resin samples have been characterised both dry as moulded and after conditioning at either 120°C or 150°C for a range of times up to 1000 hours. The results reveal that hydrothermal ageing in water-glycol mixtures results in significant changes in the mechanical performance, weight, and dimensions of these materials. The negative effects of conditioning could be mitigated to some degree by the appropriate choice of the glass fibre sizing; however the sizing effect diminished with increasing conditioning time. All materials showed a weight increase due to conditioning at 120°C which was typical of a single Fickian diffusion process and there was clear evidence of multiple processes involved when conditioning at 150°C. It was not apparent that the glass fibre sizing affected the dimensional stability of the composites. We show that there is a strong correlation between the swelling of these samples and the level of fluid adsorption. Although the PA66 resin showed reasonably homogeneous swelling, the composites exhibited different levels of swelling depending on direction. These effects were well in line with the known effects of fibres on restriction of the matrix deformation (mechanical, thermal or moisture swelling) in the fibre direction. These differences correlate well with the average fibre orientation with respect to the various direction axes. Composite tensile strength and unnotched impact resistance appeared to scale inversely with the level of swelling of the material.",
keywords = "polymer composites, materials science, structure-property relationships, glass, hydrolysis ageing, stability, polyamide",
author = "J.L. Thomason",
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N2 - We present results on an in-depth study of the effects of hydrolysis testing on the mechanical performance, weight change, and dimensional stability of injection moulded glass-fibre reinforced polyamide 66 based on two chopped fibre products with different sizing formulations. Composite and resin samples have been characterised both dry as moulded and after conditioning at either 120°C or 150°C for a range of times up to 1000 hours. The results reveal that hydrothermal ageing in water-glycol mixtures results in significant changes in the mechanical performance, weight, and dimensions of these materials. The negative effects of conditioning could be mitigated to some degree by the appropriate choice of the glass fibre sizing; however the sizing effect diminished with increasing conditioning time. All materials showed a weight increase due to conditioning at 120°C which was typical of a single Fickian diffusion process and there was clear evidence of multiple processes involved when conditioning at 150°C. It was not apparent that the glass fibre sizing affected the dimensional stability of the composites. We show that there is a strong correlation between the swelling of these samples and the level of fluid adsorption. Although the PA66 resin showed reasonably homogeneous swelling, the composites exhibited different levels of swelling depending on direction. These effects were well in line with the known effects of fibres on restriction of the matrix deformation (mechanical, thermal or moisture swelling) in the fibre direction. These differences correlate well with the average fibre orientation with respect to the various direction axes. Composite tensile strength and unnotched impact resistance appeared to scale inversely with the level of swelling of the material.

AB - We present results on an in-depth study of the effects of hydrolysis testing on the mechanical performance, weight change, and dimensional stability of injection moulded glass-fibre reinforced polyamide 66 based on two chopped fibre products with different sizing formulations. Composite and resin samples have been characterised both dry as moulded and after conditioning at either 120°C or 150°C for a range of times up to 1000 hours. The results reveal that hydrothermal ageing in water-glycol mixtures results in significant changes in the mechanical performance, weight, and dimensions of these materials. The negative effects of conditioning could be mitigated to some degree by the appropriate choice of the glass fibre sizing; however the sizing effect diminished with increasing conditioning time. All materials showed a weight increase due to conditioning at 120°C which was typical of a single Fickian diffusion process and there was clear evidence of multiple processes involved when conditioning at 150°C. It was not apparent that the glass fibre sizing affected the dimensional stability of the composites. We show that there is a strong correlation between the swelling of these samples and the level of fluid adsorption. Although the PA66 resin showed reasonably homogeneous swelling, the composites exhibited different levels of swelling depending on direction. These effects were well in line with the known effects of fibres on restriction of the matrix deformation (mechanical, thermal or moisture swelling) in the fibre direction. These differences correlate well with the average fibre orientation with respect to the various direction axes. Composite tensile strength and unnotched impact resistance appeared to scale inversely with the level of swelling of the material.

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