Structural and functional correlates of hypnotic depth and suggestibility

William Jonathan McGeown, Giuliana Mazzoni, Manila Vannucci, Annalena Venneri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study explores whether self-reported depth of hypnosis and hypnotic suggestibility are associated with individual differences in neuroanatomy and/or levels of functional connectivity. Twenty-nine people varying in suggestibility were recruited and underwent structural, and after a hypnotic induction, functional magnetic resonance imaging at rest. We used voxel-based morphometry to assess the correlation of grey matter (GM) and white matter (WM) against the independent variables: depth of hypnosis, level of relaxation and hypnotic suggestibility. Functional networks identified with independent components analysis were regressed with the independent variables. Hypnotic depth ratings were positively correlated with GM volume in the frontal cortex and the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Hypnotic suggestibility was positively correlated with GM volume in the left temporal-occipital cortex. Relaxation ratings did not correlate significantly with GM volume and none of the independent variables correlated with regional WM volume measures. Self-reported deeper levels of hypnosis were associated with less connectivity within the anterior default mode network. Taken together, the results suggest that the greater GM volume in the medial frontal cortex and ACC, and lower connectivity in the DMN during hypnosis facilitate experiences of greater hypnotic depth. The patterns of results suggest that hypnotic depth and hypnotic suggestibility should not be considered synonyms.

LanguageEnglish
Pages151-159
Number of pages9
JournalPsychiatry Research
Volume231
Issue number2
Early online date6 Dec 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 28 Feb 2015

Fingerprint

Hypnotics and Sedatives
Hypnosis
Gyrus Cinguli
Frontal Lobe
Neuroanatomy
Occipital Lobe
Temporal Lobe
Individuality
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Gray Matter

Keywords

  • hypnosis
  • susceptibility
  • voxel-based morphometry;
  • grey matter
  • white matter
  • functional connectivity

Cite this

McGeown, William Jonathan ; Mazzoni, Giuliana ; Vannucci, Manila ; Venneri, Annalena. / Structural and functional correlates of hypnotic depth and suggestibility. In: Psychiatry Research. 2015 ; Vol. 231, No. 2. pp. 151-159.
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Structural and functional correlates of hypnotic depth and suggestibility. / McGeown, William Jonathan; Mazzoni, Giuliana; Vannucci, Manila; Venneri, Annalena.

In: Psychiatry Research, Vol. 231, No. 2, 28.02.2015, p. 151-159.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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