'Stressed out of my box': employee experience of lean working and occupational ill-health in clerical work in the UK public sector

Robert Carter, Andrew Danford, Debra Howcroft, Helen Richardson, Andrew Smith, Philip Taylor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Occupational health and safety (OHS) is under-researched in the sociology of work and employment. This deficit is most pronounced for white-collar occupations. Despite growing awareness of the significance of psychosocial conditions – notably stress – and musculoskeletal disorders, white-collar work is considered by conventional OHS discourse to be ‘safe’. This study’s locus is clerical processing in the UK public sector, specifically Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs, in the context of efficiency savings programmes. The key initiative was lean working, which involved redesigned workflow, task fragmentation, standardization and individual targets. Utilizing a holistic model of white-collar OHS and in-depth quantitative and qualitative data, the evidence of widespread self-reported ill-health symptoms is compelling. Statistical tests of association demonstrate that the transformed work organization that accompanied lean working contributed most to employees’, particularly women’s, ill-health complaints.
LanguageEnglish
Pages747-767
Number of pages21
JournalWork, Employment and Society
Volume27
Issue number5
Early online date20 May 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Fingerprint

public sector
employee
health
experience
white-collar occupation
sociology of work
work organization
statistical test
workflow
complaint
fragmentation
savings
revenue
deficit
Ill-health
Public sector
Employees
Occupational safety and health
efficiency
discourse

Keywords

  • stress
  • white-collar
  • employee experience
  • lean working
  • occupational ill-health
  • UK public sector
  • clerical work
  • labour process
  • OHS
  • gender

Cite this

Carter, Robert ; Danford, Andrew ; Howcroft, Debra ; Richardson, Helen ; Smith, Andrew ; Taylor, Philip. / 'Stressed out of my box' : employee experience of lean working and occupational ill-health in clerical work in the UK public sector . In: Work, Employment and Society. 2013 ; Vol. 27, No. 5. pp. 747-767.
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'Stressed out of my box' : employee experience of lean working and occupational ill-health in clerical work in the UK public sector . / Carter, Robert ; Danford, Andrew ; Howcroft, Debra; Richardson, Helen ; Smith, Andrew; Taylor, Philip.

In: Work, Employment and Society, Vol. 27, No. 5, 2013, p. 747-767.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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