Spoken versus written queries for mobile information access

H. Du, F. Crestani

Research output: Contribution to journalConference Contribution

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ease of browsing and searching for information on mobile devices has been an area of increasing interest in the information retrieval (IR) research community. While some work has been done to enhance the usability of handwriting recognition to input queries, the characteristics of speech as an input mechanism have not been extensively studied. It is intuitive to think that users would speak more words when issuing their queries due to the ease of speech when they are enabled to form queries via voice to an information retrieval system than forming queries in written form. Is this in fact the case in reality? This paper presents some new findings derived from an experimental study to test this intuition, and assesses the feasibility of the spoken queries for the search purposes.
LanguageEnglish
Pages67-78
Number of pages11
JournalLecture Notes in Computer Science
Volume2954
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004

Fingerprint

Query
Information retrieval systems
Information Retrieval
Information retrieval
Mobile devices
Handwriting Recognition
Browsing
Mobile Devices
Usability
Intuitive
Experimental Study
Speech

Keywords

  • mobile communication
  • mobile devices
  • Information retrieval

Cite this

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title = "Spoken versus written queries for mobile information access",
abstract = "Ease of browsing and searching for information on mobile devices has been an area of increasing interest in the information retrieval (IR) research community. While some work has been done to enhance the usability of handwriting recognition to input queries, the characteristics of speech as an input mechanism have not been extensively studied. It is intuitive to think that users would speak more words when issuing their queries due to the ease of speech when they are enabled to form queries via voice to an information retrieval system than forming queries in written form. Is this in fact the case in reality? This paper presents some new findings derived from an experimental study to test this intuition, and assesses the feasibility of the spoken queries for the search purposes.",
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Spoken versus written queries for mobile information access. / Du, H.; Crestani, F.

In: Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Vol. 2954, 2004, p. 67-78.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference Contribution

TY - JOUR

T1 - Spoken versus written queries for mobile information access

AU - Du, H.

AU - Crestani, F.

N1 - MOBILE AND UBIQUITOUS INFORMATION ACCESS Lecture Notes in Computer Science, 2004, Volume 2954/2004, 127-130, DOI: 10.1007/978-3-540-24641-1_6

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KW - Information retrieval

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