Spectroscopic analysis of bacterial biological warfare simulants and the effects of environmental conditioning on a bacterial spectrum

Alastair J S McIntosh, Stephen J. Barrington, Hilary Bird, Daniel Hurst, Phillippa Spencer, Suzanne H. Pelfrey, Matthew J. Baker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The ability to distinguish bacteria from mixed samples is of great interest, especially in the medical and defence arenas. This paper reports a step towards the aim of differentiating pathogenic endospores in situ, to aid any required response for hazard management using infrared spectroscopy combined with multivariate analysis. We describe a proof-ofprinciple study aimed at discriminating biological warfare simulants from common environmental bacteria. We also report an evaluation of multiple pre-processing techniques and subsequent differences in cross-validation of two pattern recognition models (Support Vector Machines and Principal Component-Linear Discriminant Analysis) for a six-class classification (bacterial classification). These classifications were possible with an average sensitivity of 88.0 and 86.9 %, and an average specificity of 97.6 and 97.5 % for the SVM and the PC-LDA models, respectively. Most spectroscopic models are built upon spectra from bacteria that have been specifically prepared for analysis by a particular method; this paper will comment upon the differences in the bacterial spectrum that occur between specific preparations when the bacteria have spent 30 days in the simulated weather conditions of a hot dry climate.

LanguageEnglish
Pages2307-2315
Number of pages9
JournalAnalytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry
Volume404
Issue number8
Early online date14 Sep 2012
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2012

Fingerprint

Biological warfare
Biological Warfare
Spectroscopic analysis
Bacteria
Safety Management
Weather
Discriminant Analysis
Discriminant analysis
Climate
Pattern recognition
Support vector machines
Infrared spectroscopy
Spectrum Analysis
Hazards
Multivariate Analysis
Processing

Keywords

  • bacteria
  • biological warfare
  • infrared spectroscopy
  • pre-processing
  • surface deposited Bacillus

Cite this

McIntosh, Alastair J S ; Barrington, Stephen J. ; Bird, Hilary ; Hurst, Daniel ; Spencer, Phillippa ; Pelfrey, Suzanne H. ; Baker, Matthew J. / Spectroscopic analysis of bacterial biological warfare simulants and the effects of environmental conditioning on a bacterial spectrum. In: Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry. 2012 ; Vol. 404, No. 8. pp. 2307-2315.
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Spectroscopic analysis of bacterial biological warfare simulants and the effects of environmental conditioning on a bacterial spectrum. / McIntosh, Alastair J S; Barrington, Stephen J.; Bird, Hilary; Hurst, Daniel; Spencer, Phillippa; Pelfrey, Suzanne H.; Baker, Matthew J.

In: Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, Vol. 404, No. 8, 01.11.2012, p. 2307-2315.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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