Spectroscopic analysis of bacterial biological warfare simulants and the effects of environmental conditioning on a bacterial spectrum

Alastair J S McIntosh, Stephen J. Barrington, Hilary Bird, Daniel Hurst, Phillippa Spencer, Suzanne H. Pelfrey, Matthew J. Baker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The ability to distinguish bacteria from mixed samples is of great interest, especially in the medical and defence arenas. This paper reports a step towards the aim of differentiating pathogenic endospores in situ, to aid any required response for hazard management using infrared spectroscopy combined with multivariate analysis. We describe a proof-ofprinciple study aimed at discriminating biological warfare simulants from common environmental bacteria. We also report an evaluation of multiple pre-processing techniques and subsequent differences in cross-validation of two pattern recognition models (Support Vector Machines and Principal Component-Linear Discriminant Analysis) for a six-class classification (bacterial classification). These classifications were possible with an average sensitivity of 88.0 and 86.9 %, and an average specificity of 97.6 and 97.5 % for the SVM and the PC-LDA models, respectively. Most spectroscopic models are built upon spectra from bacteria that have been specifically prepared for analysis by a particular method; this paper will comment upon the differences in the bacterial spectrum that occur between specific preparations when the bacteria have spent 30 days in the simulated weather conditions of a hot dry climate.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2307-2315
Number of pages9
JournalAnalytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry
Volume404
Issue number8
Early online date14 Sep 2012
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2012

Keywords

  • bacteria
  • biological warfare
  • infrared spectroscopy
  • pre-processing
  • surface deposited Bacillus

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