Social trust and grassroots governance in rural China

Narisong Huhe, Jie Chen, Min Tang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The relationship between social trust and governance has been one of the focal points of the academic and policy-making communities. Empirical studies on this relationship, however, have focused mostly on democracies. The scarcity of such studies in authoritarian countries has left many important questions unanswered: Is social trust associated with effective governance only in democratic settings? Can social trust improve the quality of governance in non-democracies as well? Drawing on data from 2005 China General Social Survey—a representative survey conducted nationwide at both the individual- and village-level in rural China, this paper attempts to answer these questions empirically by examining the relationship between social trust and the quality of governance in rural China. The findings reveal that different types of social trust—particularized trust and generalized trust—correspond with different effects in rural governance: whereas villagers’ trust in people whom they knew personally was positively and significantly associated with the provision of various public goods and services, their trust in strangers had virtually no impact on rural governance.
LanguageEnglish
Pages351-363
Number of pages13
JournalSocial Science Research
Volume53
Early online date26 Jun 2015
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 26 Jun 2015

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governance
China
village
democracy
community

Keywords

  • social trust
  • rural governance
  • public goods provision
  • Asia

Cite this

Huhe, Narisong ; Chen, Jie ; Tang, Min. / Social trust and grassroots governance in rural China. In: Social Science Research. 2015 ; Vol. 53. pp. 351-363.
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Social trust and grassroots governance in rural China. / Huhe, Narisong; Chen, Jie; Tang, Min.

In: Social Science Research, Vol. 53, 26.06.2015, p. 351-363.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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