So Which Households Can Benefit from Energy Efficiency and is there an Argument to Fund from the Public Purse? Research Briefing 04

Karen Turner, Gioele Figus, Fiona Riddoch

Research output: Book/ReportOther report

Abstract

Improving household energy efficiency has a positive impact on a more efficient household’s income. This is because money saved by the permanent reduction in energy bills will be available to spend year on year. An EPSRC funded team at the Centre for Energy Policy and Fraser of Allander Institute at the University of Strathclyde has analysed the macroeconomic expansion likely to follow successful energy efficiency measures. This highlights the multiple dividends of energy savings, boosted GDP, employment and income benefits which result from energy efficiency measures. This latest work begins to explore the impact of focusing policy only on fuel poor households but finds that the more wide-ranging the boost to energy efficiency, the greater the economic expansion is likely to be. The multiple dividends are particularly obvious in the case where all households rather than just fuel poor households are targeted. This is due to both the greater stimulus and limited spending power of low income households. Governments should consider the wider economic and social benefits of spending on energy efficiency when designing energy efficiency policy, evaluating its outcome and making budget decisions.
LanguageEnglish
Place of PublicationGlasgow
PublisherUniversity of Strathclyde
Number of pages4
Publication statusPublished - 19 Jan 2017

Fingerprint

Energy efficiency
energy
efficiency
Economics
Energy policy
energy policy
social benefits
energy saving
household income
bill
Energy conservation
macroeconomics
economics
stimulus
budget
money
low income
income

Keywords

  • rebound effects
  • energy savings
  • energy efficiency
  • fuel poverty
  • economic impacts
  • CO2 savings
  • household energy use
  • energy policy
  • public funding

Cite this

@book{4e817f3846cd402fa082a3a8e8ad0015,
title = "So Which Households Can Benefit from Energy Efficiency and is there an Argument to Fund from the Public Purse? Research Briefing 04",
abstract = "Improving household energy efficiency has a positive impact on a more efficient household’s income. This is because money saved by the permanent reduction in energy bills will be available to spend year on year. An EPSRC funded team at the Centre for Energy Policy and Fraser of Allander Institute at the University of Strathclyde has analysed the macroeconomic expansion likely to follow successful energy efficiency measures. This highlights the multiple dividends of energy savings, boosted GDP, employment and income benefits which result from energy efficiency measures. This latest work begins to explore the impact of focusing policy only on fuel poor households but finds that the more wide-ranging the boost to energy efficiency, the greater the economic expansion is likely to be. The multiple dividends are particularly obvious in the case where all households rather than just fuel poor households are targeted. This is due to both the greater stimulus and limited spending power of low income households. Governments should consider the wider economic and social benefits of spending on energy efficiency when designing energy efficiency policy, evaluating its outcome and making budget decisions.",
keywords = "rebound effects, energy savings, energy efficiency, fuel poverty, economic impacts, CO2 savings, household energy use, energy policy, public funding",
author = "Karen Turner and Gioele Figus and Fiona Riddoch",
note = "A policy briefing published in collaboration with the Centre on Innovation and Energy Demand, University of Sussex.",
year = "2017",
month = "1",
day = "19",
language = "English",
publisher = "University of Strathclyde",

}

So Which Households Can Benefit from Energy Efficiency and is there an Argument to Fund from the Public Purse? Research Briefing 04. / Turner, Karen; Figus, Gioele; Riddoch, Fiona.

Glasgow : University of Strathclyde, 2017. 4 p.

Research output: Book/ReportOther report

TY - BOOK

T1 - So Which Households Can Benefit from Energy Efficiency and is there an Argument to Fund from the Public Purse? Research Briefing 04

AU - Turner, Karen

AU - Figus, Gioele

AU - Riddoch, Fiona

N1 - A policy briefing published in collaboration with the Centre on Innovation and Energy Demand, University of Sussex.

PY - 2017/1/19

Y1 - 2017/1/19

N2 - Improving household energy efficiency has a positive impact on a more efficient household’s income. This is because money saved by the permanent reduction in energy bills will be available to spend year on year. An EPSRC funded team at the Centre for Energy Policy and Fraser of Allander Institute at the University of Strathclyde has analysed the macroeconomic expansion likely to follow successful energy efficiency measures. This highlights the multiple dividends of energy savings, boosted GDP, employment and income benefits which result from energy efficiency measures. This latest work begins to explore the impact of focusing policy only on fuel poor households but finds that the more wide-ranging the boost to energy efficiency, the greater the economic expansion is likely to be. The multiple dividends are particularly obvious in the case where all households rather than just fuel poor households are targeted. This is due to both the greater stimulus and limited spending power of low income households. Governments should consider the wider economic and social benefits of spending on energy efficiency when designing energy efficiency policy, evaluating its outcome and making budget decisions.

AB - Improving household energy efficiency has a positive impact on a more efficient household’s income. This is because money saved by the permanent reduction in energy bills will be available to spend year on year. An EPSRC funded team at the Centre for Energy Policy and Fraser of Allander Institute at the University of Strathclyde has analysed the macroeconomic expansion likely to follow successful energy efficiency measures. This highlights the multiple dividends of energy savings, boosted GDP, employment and income benefits which result from energy efficiency measures. This latest work begins to explore the impact of focusing policy only on fuel poor households but finds that the more wide-ranging the boost to energy efficiency, the greater the economic expansion is likely to be. The multiple dividends are particularly obvious in the case where all households rather than just fuel poor households are targeted. This is due to both the greater stimulus and limited spending power of low income households. Governments should consider the wider economic and social benefits of spending on energy efficiency when designing energy efficiency policy, evaluating its outcome and making budget decisions.

KW - rebound effects

KW - energy savings

KW - energy efficiency

KW - fuel poverty

KW - economic impacts

KW - CO2 savings

KW - household energy use

KW - energy policy

KW - public funding

UR - http://www.strath.ac.uk/research/internationalpublicpolicyinstitute/

M3 - Other report

BT - So Which Households Can Benefit from Energy Efficiency and is there an Argument to Fund from the Public Purse? Research Briefing 04

PB - University of Strathclyde

CY - Glasgow

ER -