Sleipner CO2 securely stored deep beneath seabed, in spite of unexpected Hugin fracture discovery

Stuart Haszeldine, Vivian Scott, Simon Shackley, Stuart Gilfillan, Leslie Mabon, Gareth Johnson

Research output: Working paper

Abstract

General readers of Nature may now think that the proposition to store carbon dioxide in deep geological strata is doomed to fail (Monastersky 2013). This is far from the case, as a more balanced review could easily have pointed out. It is now important to provide an alternative perspective, based on published information, that geological storage of CO2 by deep injection for CCS is both sufficiently secure, and knowable in its environmental impacts. Furthermore, research has shown that there is good support from many parts of the public, although qualified, for CCS as an essential part of a response to the threat of global climate change and ocean acidification.
Original languageEnglish
Place of PublicationEdinburgh
Number of pages6
VolumeWP-SCCS 2014-01
Publication statusPublished - 13 Jan 2014

Keywords

  • co2 storage
  • carbon capture and storage
  • Hugin fracture

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    Haszeldine, S., Scott, V., Shackley, S., Gilfillan, S., Mabon, L., & Johnson, G. (2014). Sleipner CO2 securely stored deep beneath seabed, in spite of unexpected Hugin fracture discovery. Edinburgh.