Silk hydrogels for drug and cell delivery

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Silk has fascinated humans since ancient times; silk fibres have been used in textiles for more than 5,000 years and for many centuries as a suturing material (Lubec, Holbaubek et al. 1993, Omenetto and Kaplan 2010). The remarkable strength and toughness of silk stems from its evolution as a structural engineering material in nature (Vollrath and Porter 2009, Buehler 2013). Silk is a sustainable and ecologically benign biopolymer that can be manufactured using
green processes (Vollrath and Porter 2009). Over the past 25 years, we have seen a tremendous development of both bottom-up and top-down approaches for the generation of silk biopolymers.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationHydrogels
Subtitle of host publicationDesign, Synthesis & Application in Drug Delivery & Regenerative Medicine
EditorsThakur Raghu Raj Singh, Garry Laverty, Ryan Donnelly
Pages208-227
Number of pages20
Publication statusPublished - 12 Aug 2017

Fingerprint

Hydrogels
Silk
Biopolymers
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Textiles

Keywords

  • silk hydrogels
  • drug delivery
  • gelation
  • biopharmaceuticals
  • drug release
  • stem cell delivery

Cite this

Seib, F. P. (2017). Silk hydrogels for drug and cell delivery. In T. R. R. Singh, G. Laverty, & R. Donnelly (Eds.), Hydrogels: Design, Synthesis & Application in Drug Delivery & Regenerative Medicine (pp. 208-227)
Seib, F. Philipp. / Silk hydrogels for drug and cell delivery. Hydrogels: Design, Synthesis & Application in Drug Delivery & Regenerative Medicine. editor / Thakur Raghu Raj Singh ; Garry Laverty ; Ryan Donnelly. 2017. pp. 208-227
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Seib, FP 2017, Silk hydrogels for drug and cell delivery. in TRR Singh, G Laverty & R Donnelly (eds), Hydrogels: Design, Synthesis & Application in Drug Delivery & Regenerative Medicine. pp. 208-227.

Silk hydrogels for drug and cell delivery. / Seib, F. Philipp.

Hydrogels: Design, Synthesis & Application in Drug Delivery & Regenerative Medicine. ed. / Thakur Raghu Raj Singh; Garry Laverty; Ryan Donnelly. 2017. p. 208-227.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Seib FP. Silk hydrogels for drug and cell delivery. In Singh TRR, Laverty G, Donnelly R, editors, Hydrogels: Design, Synthesis & Application in Drug Delivery & Regenerative Medicine. 2017. p. 208-227