Sentencing the corporate offender: Legal and social issues

Hazel Croall, Jenifer Ross, Cyrus Tata (Editor), Neil Hutton (Editor)

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Introduction - so what does 'and society' mean?, Cyrus Tata. Part 1 The International Movement Towards Transparency and 'Truth in Sentencing': Getting tough on crime - the history and political context of sentencing reform developments leading to the passage of the crime act, Judith Greene; A sentencing matrix for Western Australia - accountability and transparency or smoke and mirrors?, Neil Morgan; Mandatory sentences - a conundrum for the new South Africa?, Dirk van Zyl Smit; Are guided sentencing and sentence bargaining incompatible? - perspectives of reform in the Italian legal system, Grazia Mannozzi; Legislation and practice of sentencing in China, Liling Yue; Sentencing reform in Canada - who cares about corrections?, Mary E. Campbell. Part 2 The Truth About Public and Victim Punitiveness - What do we Know and What do we Need to Know?: Public knowledge and public opinion of sentencing, Mike Hough and Julian V. Roberts; Crisis and contradictions in a state sentencing structure, B. Keith Crew, Gene Lutz and Kristine Fahrney; Harsher is not necessarily better - victim satisfaction with sentences imposed under a 'truth in sentencing' law, Candice McCoy and Patrick McManimon Jr. Part 3 Measuring Punishment - Conceptual and Practical Problems and Resolutions: European sentencing traditions - accepting divergence or aiming for convergence?, Andrew Ashworth; What's it worth? - a cross-jurisdictional comparison of sentence severity, Arie Frieberg; Sentencing burglars in England and Finland - a pilot study, Malcolm Davies, Jukka-Pekka Takala and Jane Tyrer; A new look at sentence severity, Brian J. Ostrom and Charles W. Ostrom; Desert and the punitiveness of imprisonment, Gavin Dingwall and Christopher Harding; The science of sentencing - measuring theory and von Hirsch's new scales of justice, Julia Davis; Scaling punishments - a reply to Julia Davis, Andrew von Hirsch; Scaling punishments - a response to von Hirsch, Julia Davis. Part 4 Reason
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationSentencing and Society
Place of PublicationHampshire, England
Pages528-547
Number of pages19
Publication statusPublished - 24 Jul 2002

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Offenders
Sentencing
Social Issues
Punishment
Crime
Transparency
Scaling
China
Justice
Canada
Gene
Divergence
Finland
Accountability
Legislation
Imprisonment
Western Australia
South Africa
Public Opinion
England

Cite this

Croall, H., Ross, J., Tata, C. (Ed.), & Hutton, N. (Ed.) (2002). Sentencing the corporate offender: Legal and social issues. In Sentencing and Society (pp. 528-547). Hampshire, England.
Croall, Hazel ; Ross, Jenifer ; Tata, Cyrus (Editor) ; Hutton, Neil (Editor). / Sentencing the corporate offender: Legal and social issues. Sentencing and Society. Hampshire, England, 2002. pp. 528-547
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Croall, H, Ross, J, Tata, C (ed.) & Hutton, N (ed.) 2002, Sentencing the corporate offender: Legal and social issues. in Sentencing and Society. Hampshire, England, pp. 528-547.

Sentencing the corporate offender: Legal and social issues. / Croall, Hazel; Ross, Jenifer; Tata, Cyrus (Editor); Hutton, Neil (Editor).

Sentencing and Society. Hampshire, England, 2002. p. 528-547.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Croall H, Ross J, Tata C, (ed.), Hutton N, (ed.). Sentencing the corporate offender: Legal and social issues. In Sentencing and Society. Hampshire, England. 2002. p. 528-547