Self-reporting materials: protein-mediated visual indication of damage in a bulk polymer

Nico Bruns, Douglas S. Clark

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Damage self-reporting materials are able to indicate the presence of microscopic damaged regions by easy to detect signals, such as fluorescence. Therefore, these smart materials can reduce the risk of catastrophic failure of load-bearing components, e.g. in aerospace and construction applications. We highlight here our proof-of-concept paper and we present some additional data, which shows that proteins can be used as mechanophores in solid polymeric materials. Macroscopic mechanical forces were transferred from the polymer to the embedded proteins. The biomolecules act as molecular strain sensor, giving the material the desired selfreporting property. Poly(ethylene glycol) and poly(acrylamide) (PAAm) networks were doped with small amounts of thermsosome (THS), a protein cage from the family of chaperonins, that encapsulated a pair of fluorescent proteins. THS acts as a scaffold which brings the two fluorescent proteins into distance suitable for fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Moreover, THS can be distorted by mechanic forces so that the distance between the fluorescent proteins changes, leading to a change in FRET efficiency. Using the brittle PAAm as a model system, we were able to visualize microcracks in the polymers by FRET microscopy and by fluorescence lifetime imaging. THS also stabilizes the encapsulated guest proteins against thermal denaturation, increasing their half-live at 70 °C by a factor of 2.3.

LanguageEnglish
Pages245-249
Number of pages5
JournalCHIMIA
Volume65
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2011

Fingerprint

Polymers
Proteins
Polyacrylates
Bearings (structural)
Fluorescence
Chaperonins
Denaturation
Intelligent materials
Ethylene Glycol
Biomolecules
Microcracks
Scaffolds
Polyethylene glycols
Microscopic examination
Mechanics
Imaging techniques
Sensors
Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer

Keywords

  • chaperonin
  • damage detection
  • hybrid materials
  • mechanophore
  • polymer

Cite this

@article{a4d94ddd589845ccb7c2b682a36caee5,
title = "Self-reporting materials: protein-mediated visual indication of damage in a bulk polymer",
abstract = "Damage self-reporting materials are able to indicate the presence of microscopic damaged regions by easy to detect signals, such as fluorescence. Therefore, these smart materials can reduce the risk of catastrophic failure of load-bearing components, e.g. in aerospace and construction applications. We highlight here our proof-of-concept paper and we present some additional data, which shows that proteins can be used as mechanophores in solid polymeric materials. Macroscopic mechanical forces were transferred from the polymer to the embedded proteins. The biomolecules act as molecular strain sensor, giving the material the desired selfreporting property. Poly(ethylene glycol) and poly(acrylamide) (PAAm) networks were doped with small amounts of thermsosome (THS), a protein cage from the family of chaperonins, that encapsulated a pair of fluorescent proteins. THS acts as a scaffold which brings the two fluorescent proteins into distance suitable for fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Moreover, THS can be distorted by mechanic forces so that the distance between the fluorescent proteins changes, leading to a change in FRET efficiency. Using the brittle PAAm as a model system, we were able to visualize microcracks in the polymers by FRET microscopy and by fluorescence lifetime imaging. THS also stabilizes the encapsulated guest proteins against thermal denaturation, increasing their half-live at 70 °C by a factor of 2.3.",
keywords = "chaperonin, damage detection, hybrid materials, mechanophore, polymer",
author = "Nico Bruns and Clark, {Douglas S.}",
year = "2011",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.2533/chimia.2011.245",
language = "English",
volume = "65",
pages = "245--249",
journal = "CHIMIA",
issn = "0009-4293",
number = "4",

}

Self-reporting materials : protein-mediated visual indication of damage in a bulk polymer. / Bruns, Nico; Clark, Douglas S.

In: CHIMIA, Vol. 65, No. 4, 01.04.2011, p. 245-249.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Self-reporting materials

T2 - CHIMIA

AU - Bruns, Nico

AU - Clark, Douglas S.

PY - 2011/4/1

Y1 - 2011/4/1

N2 - Damage self-reporting materials are able to indicate the presence of microscopic damaged regions by easy to detect signals, such as fluorescence. Therefore, these smart materials can reduce the risk of catastrophic failure of load-bearing components, e.g. in aerospace and construction applications. We highlight here our proof-of-concept paper and we present some additional data, which shows that proteins can be used as mechanophores in solid polymeric materials. Macroscopic mechanical forces were transferred from the polymer to the embedded proteins. The biomolecules act as molecular strain sensor, giving the material the desired selfreporting property. Poly(ethylene glycol) and poly(acrylamide) (PAAm) networks were doped with small amounts of thermsosome (THS), a protein cage from the family of chaperonins, that encapsulated a pair of fluorescent proteins. THS acts as a scaffold which brings the two fluorescent proteins into distance suitable for fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Moreover, THS can be distorted by mechanic forces so that the distance between the fluorescent proteins changes, leading to a change in FRET efficiency. Using the brittle PAAm as a model system, we were able to visualize microcracks in the polymers by FRET microscopy and by fluorescence lifetime imaging. THS also stabilizes the encapsulated guest proteins against thermal denaturation, increasing their half-live at 70 °C by a factor of 2.3.

AB - Damage self-reporting materials are able to indicate the presence of microscopic damaged regions by easy to detect signals, such as fluorescence. Therefore, these smart materials can reduce the risk of catastrophic failure of load-bearing components, e.g. in aerospace and construction applications. We highlight here our proof-of-concept paper and we present some additional data, which shows that proteins can be used as mechanophores in solid polymeric materials. Macroscopic mechanical forces were transferred from the polymer to the embedded proteins. The biomolecules act as molecular strain sensor, giving the material the desired selfreporting property. Poly(ethylene glycol) and poly(acrylamide) (PAAm) networks were doped with small amounts of thermsosome (THS), a protein cage from the family of chaperonins, that encapsulated a pair of fluorescent proteins. THS acts as a scaffold which brings the two fluorescent proteins into distance suitable for fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Moreover, THS can be distorted by mechanic forces so that the distance between the fluorescent proteins changes, leading to a change in FRET efficiency. Using the brittle PAAm as a model system, we were able to visualize microcracks in the polymers by FRET microscopy and by fluorescence lifetime imaging. THS also stabilizes the encapsulated guest proteins against thermal denaturation, increasing their half-live at 70 °C by a factor of 2.3.

KW - chaperonin

KW - damage detection

KW - hybrid materials

KW - mechanophore

KW - polymer

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79955765465&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.2533/chimia.2011.245

DO - 10.2533/chimia.2011.245

M3 - Article

VL - 65

SP - 245

EP - 249

JO - CHIMIA

JF - CHIMIA

SN - 0009-4293

IS - 4

ER -