Self-concept, emotions and consumer coping

smoking across Europe

K.L. Hamilton, L.M. Hassan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)
1851 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Whereas much previous research focuses on the ways consumers strive to gain social approval, consumption that may result in social disapproval must be considered. In order to do so, the purpose of this paper is to explore consumers' self-concepts within a risky consumption context, namely smoking. Self-concept discrepancies and the resulting emotions and coping strategies are identified. A qualitative methodology based on 30 focus groups conducted across ten European countries is employed. Findings demonstrate self-concept discrepancies between both the actual self and ought/ideal guiding end states, as well as between the 'I' and social selves. Such discrepancies generate negative emotions and result in emotion-focused coping strategies. In addition, the accuracy of smokers' social self-concepts with reference to the actual perceptions of non-smokers is discussed. Important implications for the design of effective anti-smoking advertising are discussed, based on the findings. It is suggested that counter advertising should encourage dialogue between smokers and non-smokers and that message themes should centre on building the self-efficacy of smokers. The reason why the social context should be an integral part of consumer self-concept research is highlighted. Moreover, the importance of moving beyond merely understanding the existence of self-discrepancies, to focus on the emotions that are generated by these discrepancies and the consequent coping strategies employed to resolve them is identified. As such, the potential contributions that may arise by recognising the intersection between two bodies of literature that are often treated separately, namely, consumer coping and the self-concept, are highlighted.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1101-1120
Number of pages20
JournalEuropean Journal of Marketing
Volume44
Issue number7/8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Fingerprint

Smoking
Self-concept
Emotion
Discrepancy
Coping strategies
Negative emotions
European countries
Qualitative methodology
Focus groups
Social context
Self-efficacy
Integral

Keywords

  • cigarettes
  • social stratification
  • consumer behaviour
  • consumer behavior

Cite this

@article{511226986cc641cdb93317e191e2cf7d,
title = "Self-concept, emotions and consumer coping: smoking across Europe",
abstract = "Whereas much previous research focuses on the ways consumers strive to gain social approval, consumption that may result in social disapproval must be considered. In order to do so, the purpose of this paper is to explore consumers' self-concepts within a risky consumption context, namely smoking. Self-concept discrepancies and the resulting emotions and coping strategies are identified. A qualitative methodology based on 30 focus groups conducted across ten European countries is employed. Findings demonstrate self-concept discrepancies between both the actual self and ought/ideal guiding end states, as well as between the 'I' and social selves. Such discrepancies generate negative emotions and result in emotion-focused coping strategies. In addition, the accuracy of smokers' social self-concepts with reference to the actual perceptions of non-smokers is discussed. Important implications for the design of effective anti-smoking advertising are discussed, based on the findings. It is suggested that counter advertising should encourage dialogue between smokers and non-smokers and that message themes should centre on building the self-efficacy of smokers. The reason why the social context should be an integral part of consumer self-concept research is highlighted. Moreover, the importance of moving beyond merely understanding the existence of self-discrepancies, to focus on the emotions that are generated by these discrepancies and the consequent coping strategies employed to resolve them is identified. As such, the potential contributions that may arise by recognising the intersection between two bodies of literature that are often treated separately, namely, consumer coping and the self-concept, are highlighted.",
keywords = "cigarettes, social stratification, consumer behaviour, consumer behavior",
author = "K.L. Hamilton and L.M. Hassan",
year = "2010",
doi = "10.1108/03090561011047544",
language = "English",
volume = "44",
pages = "1101--1120",
journal = "European Journal of Marketing",
issn = "0309-0566",
publisher = "Emerald Publishing Limited",
number = "7/8",

}

Self-concept, emotions and consumer coping : smoking across Europe. / Hamilton, K.L.; Hassan, L.M.

In: European Journal of Marketing, Vol. 44, No. 7/8, 2010, p. 1101-1120.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Self-concept, emotions and consumer coping

T2 - smoking across Europe

AU - Hamilton, K.L.

AU - Hassan, L.M.

PY - 2010

Y1 - 2010

N2 - Whereas much previous research focuses on the ways consumers strive to gain social approval, consumption that may result in social disapproval must be considered. In order to do so, the purpose of this paper is to explore consumers' self-concepts within a risky consumption context, namely smoking. Self-concept discrepancies and the resulting emotions and coping strategies are identified. A qualitative methodology based on 30 focus groups conducted across ten European countries is employed. Findings demonstrate self-concept discrepancies between both the actual self and ought/ideal guiding end states, as well as between the 'I' and social selves. Such discrepancies generate negative emotions and result in emotion-focused coping strategies. In addition, the accuracy of smokers' social self-concepts with reference to the actual perceptions of non-smokers is discussed. Important implications for the design of effective anti-smoking advertising are discussed, based on the findings. It is suggested that counter advertising should encourage dialogue between smokers and non-smokers and that message themes should centre on building the self-efficacy of smokers. The reason why the social context should be an integral part of consumer self-concept research is highlighted. Moreover, the importance of moving beyond merely understanding the existence of self-discrepancies, to focus on the emotions that are generated by these discrepancies and the consequent coping strategies employed to resolve them is identified. As such, the potential contributions that may arise by recognising the intersection between two bodies of literature that are often treated separately, namely, consumer coping and the self-concept, are highlighted.

AB - Whereas much previous research focuses on the ways consumers strive to gain social approval, consumption that may result in social disapproval must be considered. In order to do so, the purpose of this paper is to explore consumers' self-concepts within a risky consumption context, namely smoking. Self-concept discrepancies and the resulting emotions and coping strategies are identified. A qualitative methodology based on 30 focus groups conducted across ten European countries is employed. Findings demonstrate self-concept discrepancies between both the actual self and ought/ideal guiding end states, as well as between the 'I' and social selves. Such discrepancies generate negative emotions and result in emotion-focused coping strategies. In addition, the accuracy of smokers' social self-concepts with reference to the actual perceptions of non-smokers is discussed. Important implications for the design of effective anti-smoking advertising are discussed, based on the findings. It is suggested that counter advertising should encourage dialogue between smokers and non-smokers and that message themes should centre on building the self-efficacy of smokers. The reason why the social context should be an integral part of consumer self-concept research is highlighted. Moreover, the importance of moving beyond merely understanding the existence of self-discrepancies, to focus on the emotions that are generated by these discrepancies and the consequent coping strategies employed to resolve them is identified. As such, the potential contributions that may arise by recognising the intersection between two bodies of literature that are often treated separately, namely, consumer coping and the self-concept, are highlighted.

KW - cigarettes

KW - social stratification

KW - consumer behaviour

KW - consumer behavior

U2 - 10.1108/03090561011047544

DO - 10.1108/03090561011047544

M3 - Article

VL - 44

SP - 1101

EP - 1120

JO - European Journal of Marketing

JF - European Journal of Marketing

SN - 0309-0566

IS - 7/8

ER -