SeaBioTech: from sea-bed to test-bed : harvesting the potential of marine biodiversity for industrial biotechnology

Lynsey MacIntyre, Tong Zhang, Christina Victoria Viegelmann, Cheng Cheng, Dominick Perrocco, Catherine Dowdells, Ute Hentschel-Humeida, Usama Ramada Abdelmohsen, Ignacio Juarez Martinez, Olivia Moss, Ruangelie Edrada-Ebel

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

Abstract

SeaBioTech is an EU-FP7 project designed and driven by SMEs to create innovative marine biodiscovery pipelines as a means to convert the potential of marine biotechnology into novel industrial products for the pharmaceutical (human and aquaculture), cosmetic, functional food and industrial chemistry sectors. Sponges are a rich source of novel metabolites that are of medicinal interest particularly as anticancer compounds. However, it is not economically viable to target sponges as sources of commercial quantities of metabolites of interest. Sponge-associated endosymbiotic bacteria produce a plethora of novel secondary metabolites which may be structurally unique with interesting pharmacological properties. These metabolites can be produced in large quantities on a biotechnological scale without the need to harvest the sponge. As a case study for SeaBioTech the metabolomic methods of dereplication and metabolic profiling were used to identify pharmacologically relevant secondary metabolites from sponge-associated endosymbiotic bacteria from marine salt water sponges using LC-FTMS and NMR spectroscopy.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2013
Event14th International Symposium on Marine Natural Products and 8th European Conference on Marine Natural Products - La Toja, Spain
Duration: 15 Sep 201320 Sep 2013

Conference

Conference14th International Symposium on Marine Natural Products and 8th European Conference on Marine Natural Products
CountrySpain
CityLa Toja
Period15/09/1320/09/13

Keywords

  • SeaBioTech
  • marine biodiscovery pipelines
  • marine biotechnology
  • sponges
  • metabolites
  • anticancer compounds
  • metabolomic methods

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