Screening the low molecular weight fraction of human serum using ATR-IR spectroscopy

Franck Bonnier, Guillaume Brachet, Romain Duong, Tobiloba Sojinrin, Renaud Respaud, Nicolas Aubrey, Matthew J. Baker, Hugh J. Byrne, Igor Chourpa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Vibrational spectroscopic techniques can detect small variations in molecular content, linked with disease, showing promise for screening and early diagnosis. Biological fluids, particularly blood serum, are potentially valuable for diagnosis purposes. The so-called Low Molecular Weight Fraction (LMWF) contains the associated peptidome and metabolome and has been identified as potentially the most relevant molecular population for disease-associated biomarker research. Although vibrational spectroscopy can deliver a specific chemical fingerprint of the samples, the High Molecular Weight Fraction (HMWF), composed of the most abundant serum proteins, strongly dominates the response and ultimately makes the detection of minor spectral variations a challenging task. Spectroscopic detection of potential serum biomarkers present at relatively low concentrations can be improved using pre-analytical depletion of the HMWF. In the present study, human serum fractionation by centrifugal filtration was used prior to analysis by Attenuated Total Reflection infrared spectroscopy. Using a model sample based on glycine spiked serum, it is demonstrated that the screening of the LMWF can be applied to quantify blinded concentrations up to 50 times lower. Moreover, the approach is easily transferable to different bodily fluids which would support the development of more efficient and suitable clinical protocols exploring vibrational spectroscopy based ex-vivo diagnostic tools.
LanguageEnglish
Pages1-16
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Biophotonics
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 10 Aug 2016

Fingerprint

low molecular weights
serums
Infrared spectroscopy
Spectrum Analysis
Screening
screening
Molecular Weight
Molecular weight
Vibrational spectroscopy
biomarkers
Biomarkers
Serum
spectroscopy
molecular weight
blood serum
Fluids
Metabolome
fluids
Dermatoglyphics
Fractionation

Keywords

  • human serum
  • centrifugal filtration
  • IR spectroscopy
  • attenuated total reflection
  • principal component analysis
  • low molecular weight fraction

Cite this

Bonnier, F., Brachet, G., Duong, R., Sojinrin, T., Respaud, R., Aubrey, N., ... Chourpa, I. (2016). Screening the low molecular weight fraction of human serum using ATR-IR spectroscopy. Journal of Biophotonics, 1-16. https://doi.org/10.1002/jbio.201600015
Bonnier, Franck ; Brachet, Guillaume ; Duong, Romain ; Sojinrin, Tobiloba ; Respaud, Renaud ; Aubrey, Nicolas ; Baker, Matthew J. ; Byrne, Hugh J. ; Chourpa, Igor. / Screening the low molecular weight fraction of human serum using ATR-IR spectroscopy. In: Journal of Biophotonics. 2016 ; pp. 1-16.
@article{07472649c60946c9b8b10384e1b9b65c,
title = "Screening the low molecular weight fraction of human serum using ATR-IR spectroscopy",
abstract = "Vibrational spectroscopic techniques can detect small variations in molecular content, linked with disease, showing promise for screening and early diagnosis. Biological fluids, particularly blood serum, are potentially valuable for diagnosis purposes. The so-called Low Molecular Weight Fraction (LMWF) contains the associated peptidome and metabolome and has been identified as potentially the most relevant molecular population for disease-associated biomarker research. Although vibrational spectroscopy can deliver a specific chemical fingerprint of the samples, the High Molecular Weight Fraction (HMWF), composed of the most abundant serum proteins, strongly dominates the response and ultimately makes the detection of minor spectral variations a challenging task. Spectroscopic detection of potential serum biomarkers present at relatively low concentrations can be improved using pre-analytical depletion of the HMWF. In the present study, human serum fractionation by centrifugal filtration was used prior to analysis by Attenuated Total Reflection infrared spectroscopy. Using a model sample based on glycine spiked serum, it is demonstrated that the screening of the LMWF can be applied to quantify blinded concentrations up to 50 times lower. Moreover, the approach is easily transferable to different bodily fluids which would support the development of more efficient and suitable clinical protocols exploring vibrational spectroscopy based ex-vivo diagnostic tools.",
keywords = "human serum, centrifugal filtration, IR spectroscopy, attenuated total reflection, principal component analysis, low molecular weight fraction",
author = "Franck Bonnier and Guillaume Brachet and Romain Duong and Tobiloba Sojinrin and Renaud Respaud and Nicolas Aubrey and Baker, {Matthew J.} and Byrne, {Hugh J.} and Igor Chourpa",
note = "This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Bonnier, F., Brachet, G., Duong, R., Sojinrin, T., Respaud, R., Aubrey, N., ... Chourpa, I. (2016). Screening the low molecular weight fraction of human serum using ATR-IR spectroscopy. Journal of Biophotonics, 1-16, which has been published in final form at 10.1002/jbio.201600015. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving",
year = "2016",
month = "8",
day = "10",
doi = "10.1002/jbio.201600015",
language = "English",
pages = "1--16",
journal = "Journal of Biophotonics",
issn = "1864-063X",

}

Bonnier, F, Brachet, G, Duong, R, Sojinrin, T, Respaud, R, Aubrey, N, Baker, MJ, Byrne, HJ & Chourpa, I 2016, 'Screening the low molecular weight fraction of human serum using ATR-IR spectroscopy' Journal of Biophotonics, pp. 1-16. https://doi.org/10.1002/jbio.201600015

Screening the low molecular weight fraction of human serum using ATR-IR spectroscopy. / Bonnier, Franck; Brachet, Guillaume; Duong, Romain; Sojinrin, Tobiloba; Respaud, Renaud; Aubrey, Nicolas; Baker, Matthew J.; Byrne, Hugh J.; Chourpa, Igor.

In: Journal of Biophotonics, 10.08.2016, p. 1-16.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Screening the low molecular weight fraction of human serum using ATR-IR spectroscopy

AU - Bonnier, Franck

AU - Brachet, Guillaume

AU - Duong, Romain

AU - Sojinrin, Tobiloba

AU - Respaud, Renaud

AU - Aubrey, Nicolas

AU - Baker, Matthew J.

AU - Byrne, Hugh J.

AU - Chourpa, Igor

N1 - This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Bonnier, F., Brachet, G., Duong, R., Sojinrin, T., Respaud, R., Aubrey, N., ... Chourpa, I. (2016). Screening the low molecular weight fraction of human serum using ATR-IR spectroscopy. Journal of Biophotonics, 1-16, which has been published in final form at 10.1002/jbio.201600015. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving

PY - 2016/8/10

Y1 - 2016/8/10

N2 - Vibrational spectroscopic techniques can detect small variations in molecular content, linked with disease, showing promise for screening and early diagnosis. Biological fluids, particularly blood serum, are potentially valuable for diagnosis purposes. The so-called Low Molecular Weight Fraction (LMWF) contains the associated peptidome and metabolome and has been identified as potentially the most relevant molecular population for disease-associated biomarker research. Although vibrational spectroscopy can deliver a specific chemical fingerprint of the samples, the High Molecular Weight Fraction (HMWF), composed of the most abundant serum proteins, strongly dominates the response and ultimately makes the detection of minor spectral variations a challenging task. Spectroscopic detection of potential serum biomarkers present at relatively low concentrations can be improved using pre-analytical depletion of the HMWF. In the present study, human serum fractionation by centrifugal filtration was used prior to analysis by Attenuated Total Reflection infrared spectroscopy. Using a model sample based on glycine spiked serum, it is demonstrated that the screening of the LMWF can be applied to quantify blinded concentrations up to 50 times lower. Moreover, the approach is easily transferable to different bodily fluids which would support the development of more efficient and suitable clinical protocols exploring vibrational spectroscopy based ex-vivo diagnostic tools.

AB - Vibrational spectroscopic techniques can detect small variations in molecular content, linked with disease, showing promise for screening and early diagnosis. Biological fluids, particularly blood serum, are potentially valuable for diagnosis purposes. The so-called Low Molecular Weight Fraction (LMWF) contains the associated peptidome and metabolome and has been identified as potentially the most relevant molecular population for disease-associated biomarker research. Although vibrational spectroscopy can deliver a specific chemical fingerprint of the samples, the High Molecular Weight Fraction (HMWF), composed of the most abundant serum proteins, strongly dominates the response and ultimately makes the detection of minor spectral variations a challenging task. Spectroscopic detection of potential serum biomarkers present at relatively low concentrations can be improved using pre-analytical depletion of the HMWF. In the present study, human serum fractionation by centrifugal filtration was used prior to analysis by Attenuated Total Reflection infrared spectroscopy. Using a model sample based on glycine spiked serum, it is demonstrated that the screening of the LMWF can be applied to quantify blinded concentrations up to 50 times lower. Moreover, the approach is easily transferable to different bodily fluids which would support the development of more efficient and suitable clinical protocols exploring vibrational spectroscopy based ex-vivo diagnostic tools.

KW - human serum

KW - centrifugal filtration

KW - IR spectroscopy

KW - attenuated total reflection

KW - principal component analysis

KW - low molecular weight fraction

U2 - 10.1002/jbio.201600015

DO - 10.1002/jbio.201600015

M3 - Article

SP - 1

EP - 16

JO - Journal of Biophotonics

T2 - Journal of Biophotonics

JF - Journal of Biophotonics

SN - 1864-063X

ER -