Scotland's gender pay gap: latest data and insights

Graeme Roy (Editor), Neil Hamilton, Kenny Richmond

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Women working full-time in Scotland earn less on average than men. Scotland’s gender pay gap at 6.2% in 2016 is smaller than the UK average and is generally declining. However, key sectors and occupations continue to post substantial pay gaps. Occupational segregation, across sectors, is a major factor in explaining Scotland’s gender pay gap, but the underlying causes are the career disruptions of female workers plus some combination of other harder to measure factors such as discrimination and gender bias. The potential economic benefits from closing Scotland’s gender pay gap are substantial; a more engaged, inclusive and productive workforce, an increase in consumer spending and an easing of skills shortages.
    LanguageEnglish
    Pages51-65
    Number of pages15
    JournalFraser of Allander Economic Commentary
    Volume41
    Issue number2
    Publication statusPublished - 29 Jun 2017

    Fingerprint

    Gender pay gap
    Scotland
    Factors
    Workers
    Consumer spending
    Key sectors
    Discrimination
    Economic benefits
    Workforce
    Gender bias
    Skills shortages
    Disruption
    Occupational segregation

    Keywords

    • Scottish economic activity
    • Scotland
    • gender pay gap

    Cite this

    Roy, Graeme (Editor) ; Hamilton, Neil ; Richmond, Kenny. / Scotland's gender pay gap : latest data and insights. In: Fraser of Allander Economic Commentary. 2017 ; Vol. 41, No. 2. pp. 51-65.
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    Scotland's gender pay gap : latest data and insights. / Roy, Graeme (Editor); Hamilton, Neil; Richmond, Kenny.

    In: Fraser of Allander Economic Commentary, Vol. 41, No. 2, 29.06.2017, p. 51-65.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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