Scotland's Demographic Dilemma

R.E. Wright, K. Lisenkova

Research output: Working paperDiscussion paper

Abstract

Lisenkova and Wright supplement Ermisch's paper with data focusing particularly on Scotland. The data suggest that population decline is further advanced here than south of the border. Their discussion of policy implications notes that while not all effects of population decline are negative, the negative impacts of a declining labour force have clear negative macroeconomic consequences: reducing competitiveness and output while increasing inflation. They suggest increased net migration, increasing women's labour market participation, and increasing productivity as policy responses that could mitigate population ageing and its effects. The paper ends by sketching out the dilemma posed by demographic decline: as populations age costs increase yet the ability of an economy to meet those costs is likely to decline as well.
LanguageEnglish
Place of PublicationEdinburgh
Number of pages22
Publication statusPublished - 2009

Fingerprint

population decrease
inflation
macroeconomics
supplement
labor market
productivity
migration
participation
economy
ability
costs

Keywords

  • Scotland
  • demographics
  • demography
  • population decline
  • declining labour force
  • competitiveness

Cite this

Wright, R. E., & Lisenkova, K. (2009). Scotland's Demographic Dilemma. Edinburgh.
Wright, R.E. ; Lisenkova, K. / Scotland's Demographic Dilemma. Edinburgh, 2009.
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Wright, RE & Lisenkova, K 2009 'Scotland's Demographic Dilemma' Edinburgh.

Scotland's Demographic Dilemma. / Wright, R.E.; Lisenkova, K.

Edinburgh, 2009.

Research output: Working paperDiscussion paper

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AB - Lisenkova and Wright supplement Ermisch's paper with data focusing particularly on Scotland. The data suggest that population decline is further advanced here than south of the border. Their discussion of policy implications notes that while not all effects of population decline are negative, the negative impacts of a declining labour force have clear negative macroeconomic consequences: reducing competitiveness and output while increasing inflation. They suggest increased net migration, increasing women's labour market participation, and increasing productivity as policy responses that could mitigate population ageing and its effects. The paper ends by sketching out the dilemma posed by demographic decline: as populations age costs increase yet the ability of an economy to meet those costs is likely to decline as well.

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KW - demography

KW - population decline

KW - declining labour force

KW - competitiveness

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Wright RE, Lisenkova K. Scotland's Demographic Dilemma. Edinburgh. 2009.