Scotland's craft industry: quality not quantity

Lyle Moar, N Fraser (Editor)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Throughout Scotland there are a large number of small craft enterprises such
as potters, weavers, jewellers and the like. The success of these ventures has given an added boost to the tourism industry in Scotland, as suggested by Harvie, and is a good example of indigenous skills replacing foreign imports. Indeed the proliferation of craft enterprises is itself an indication of their success. However tourism, whilst important, cannot fully explain the rejuvenation of crafts over the recent past in Scotland. Harvie, for example, implies thatnot only has the potential for import substitution been recognised but also that consumption patterns themselves have changed. Society appears to have a different set of values and aspirations. The aim of this Brief is to describe the current structure of
the craft industry in Scotland emphasising the historical associations which have provided a sound springboard from which to promote and market a wide range of modern craft products. Finally it is intended to discuss some issues relating to the future of the craft manufacturing units, bearing in mind that not only are they vulnerable to changes in consumer tastes but also to the economic pressures which determine the ability of all firms to survive in a commercial and competitive market place.
LanguageEnglish
Pages28-37
Number of pages10
JournalQuarterly Economic Commentary
Volume8
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Aug 1982
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

import
tourism
market
substitution
manufacturing
craft industry
craft
Industry
Scotland
industry
economics
firm
consumption pattern
product
sound
Tourism industry
Tourism
Economics
Import substitution
Proliferation

Keywords

  • Scottish craft industries
  • tourism
  • economic development
  • Scotland
  • Scottish economy

Cite this

Moar, L., & Fraser, N. (Ed.) (1982). Scotland's craft industry: quality not quantity. Quarterly Economic Commentary, 8(1), 28-37.
Moar, Lyle ; Fraser, N (Editor). / Scotland's craft industry : quality not quantity. In: Quarterly Economic Commentary. 1982 ; Vol. 8, No. 1. pp. 28-37.
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Moar, L & Fraser, N (ed.) 1982, 'Scotland's craft industry: quality not quantity' Quarterly Economic Commentary, vol. 8, no. 1, pp. 28-37.

Scotland's craft industry : quality not quantity. / Moar, Lyle; Fraser, N (Editor).

In: Quarterly Economic Commentary, Vol. 8, No. 1, 08.1982, p. 28-37.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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