Rigour, relevance and reward: introducing the knowledge translation value-chain

Richard Thorpe, Colin Eden, John Bessant, Paul Ellwood

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    27 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This paper recognizes the substantive contributions made within the British Journal of Management to conducting research relevant to management at the level of individual studies. We aim to reorient the debate to take account of a researcher's contribution to practice over time and, by so doing, to indicate the range of ways knowledge can be translated and (through engagement with users and policymakers) modified, embedded and otherwise found useful. To achieve this, we conceptualize management scholarship as a knowledge translation value-chain. We propose that, to maximize relevance, knowledge must be reconfigured in multiple contexts, of which management research provides but one. The paper concludes with observations on the additional skills that researchers might need to make use of opportunities for engagement right across the knowledge translation value-chain.
    LanguageEnglish
    Pages420-431
    Number of pages12
    JournalBritish Journal of Management
    Volume22
    Issue number3
    Early online date19 Aug 2011
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Sep 2011

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    Value chain
    Reward
    Management research
    Politicians

    Keywords

    • policymaking
    • knowledge translation value-chain

    Cite this

    Thorpe, Richard ; Eden, Colin ; Bessant, John ; Ellwood, Paul. / Rigour, relevance and reward : introducing the knowledge translation value-chain. In: British Journal of Management. 2011 ; Vol. 22, No. 3. pp. 420-431.
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    Rigour, relevance and reward : introducing the knowledge translation value-chain. / Thorpe, Richard; Eden, Colin; Bessant, John; Ellwood, Paul.

    In: British Journal of Management, Vol. 22, No. 3, 09.2011, p. 420-431.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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