Review of George R. Boyer, The winding road to the welfare state—economic insecurity and social welfare policy in Britain, Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2019

    Research output: Contribution to journalBook/Film/Article review

    Abstract

    In 1943, Karl de Schweinitz set out to ‘summarise … the most significant trends in the English development’ of social security, from the Statute of Labourers in 1349 to the publication of the Beveridge Report on Social Insurance and Allied Services almost 600 years later. He argued that Beveridge’s Plan ‘marks the highest point which England has reached on her road to social security’ and that ‘the people of England have come at last … “to the top of the hill called Clear” whence they can see opening before them the way to freedom with security’ (De Schweinitz 1943: v, 245–246).
    Original languageEnglish
    Number of pages3
    JournalJournal of Economics
    DOIs
    Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 28 Feb 2019

    Fingerprint

    Social welfare
    Social security
    England
    Roads
    Welfare policy
    Social insurance
    Statute

    Keywords

    • Karl de Schweinitz
    • welfare reforms
    • Beveridgean reform

    Cite this

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    abstract = "In 1943, Karl de Schweinitz set out to ‘summarise … the most significant trends in the English development’ of social security, from the Statute of Labourers in 1349 to the publication of the Beveridge Report on Social Insurance and Allied Services almost 600 years later. He argued that Beveridge’s Plan ‘marks the highest point which England has reached on her road to social security’ and that ‘the people of England have come at last … “to the top of the hill called Clear” whence they can see opening before them the way to freedom with security’ (De Schweinitz 1943: v, 245–246).",
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