Review of Evidence on Personal Outcomes Relevant to the Carers (Scotland) Act 2016

    Research output: Book/ReportCommissioned report

    Abstract

    This review identified several long-term programmes on outcomes focused planning, some specific to carers, based in England, Wales, Canada, Sweden and Scotland.

    Key features of early work by the Social Policy Research Unit (SPRU) at York University influenced later work in Scotland and include adoption of similar frameworks for service users and carers, the inclusion of both process and quality of life outcomes, and the exchange model of assessment, which incorporates the views of service users, carers, practitioners and agencies in negotiating and agreeing outcomes.

    The SPRU programme adopted ‘whole systems thinking’ to reflect awareness that resolution of many health and social problems, and achievement of outcomes for people, lie beyond the ability of any one practitioner or agency. It was acknowledged that systems are complex networks of inter-relationships, which links to the recent emphasis on complex adaptive systems highlighted in the implementation paper that sits alongside this paper. A ‘paradigmatic leap’ in service designed and delivery is required.
    Literature on outcomes for young carers is more limited but growing and identifies long-term impacts of substantial caring on development and opportunities into adulthood. Separate work is underway focusing on young carers relating to the Act.
    LanguageEnglish
    Place of PublicationEdinburgh
    Commissioning bodyScottish Goverment
    Number of pages16
    Publication statusPublished - 3 Aug 2017

    Fingerprint

    act
    evidence
    Social Problems
    adulthood
    Sweden
    quality of life
    inclusion
    Canada
    planning
    ability
    health
    Social Policy
    literature

    Keywords

    • carers
    • care programmes
    • young carers

    Cite this

    @book{eb1e5d7715ed4f94b55cad77b5349bf3,
    title = "Review of Evidence on Personal Outcomes Relevant to the Carers (Scotland) Act 2016",
    abstract = "This review identified several long-term programmes on outcomes focused planning, some specific to carers, based in England, Wales, Canada, Sweden and Scotland. Key features of early work by the Social Policy Research Unit (SPRU) at York University influenced later work in Scotland and include adoption of similar frameworks for service users and carers, the inclusion of both process and quality of life outcomes, and the exchange model of assessment, which incorporates the views of service users, carers, practitioners and agencies in negotiating and agreeing outcomes. The SPRU programme adopted ‘whole systems thinking’ to reflect awareness that resolution of many health and social problems, and achievement of outcomes for people, lie beyond the ability of any one practitioner or agency. It was acknowledged that systems are complex networks of inter-relationships, which links to the recent emphasis on complex adaptive systems highlighted in the implementation paper that sits alongside this paper. A ‘paradigmatic leap’ in service designed and delivery is required. Literature on outcomes for young carers is more limited but growing and identifies long-term impacts of substantial caring on development and opportunities into adulthood. Separate work is underway focusing on young carers relating to the Act.",
    keywords = "carers, care programmes, young carers",
    author = "Emma Miller",
    year = "2017",
    month = "8",
    day = "3",
    language = "English",

    }

    Review of Evidence on Personal Outcomes Relevant to the Carers (Scotland) Act 2016. / Miller, Emma.

    Edinburgh, 2017. 16 p.

    Research output: Book/ReportCommissioned report

    TY - BOOK

    T1 - Review of Evidence on Personal Outcomes Relevant to the Carers (Scotland) Act 2016

    AU - Miller, Emma

    PY - 2017/8/3

    Y1 - 2017/8/3

    N2 - This review identified several long-term programmes on outcomes focused planning, some specific to carers, based in England, Wales, Canada, Sweden and Scotland. Key features of early work by the Social Policy Research Unit (SPRU) at York University influenced later work in Scotland and include adoption of similar frameworks for service users and carers, the inclusion of both process and quality of life outcomes, and the exchange model of assessment, which incorporates the views of service users, carers, practitioners and agencies in negotiating and agreeing outcomes. The SPRU programme adopted ‘whole systems thinking’ to reflect awareness that resolution of many health and social problems, and achievement of outcomes for people, lie beyond the ability of any one practitioner or agency. It was acknowledged that systems are complex networks of inter-relationships, which links to the recent emphasis on complex adaptive systems highlighted in the implementation paper that sits alongside this paper. A ‘paradigmatic leap’ in service designed and delivery is required. Literature on outcomes for young carers is more limited but growing and identifies long-term impacts of substantial caring on development and opportunities into adulthood. Separate work is underway focusing on young carers relating to the Act.

    AB - This review identified several long-term programmes on outcomes focused planning, some specific to carers, based in England, Wales, Canada, Sweden and Scotland. Key features of early work by the Social Policy Research Unit (SPRU) at York University influenced later work in Scotland and include adoption of similar frameworks for service users and carers, the inclusion of both process and quality of life outcomes, and the exchange model of assessment, which incorporates the views of service users, carers, practitioners and agencies in negotiating and agreeing outcomes. The SPRU programme adopted ‘whole systems thinking’ to reflect awareness that resolution of many health and social problems, and achievement of outcomes for people, lie beyond the ability of any one practitioner or agency. It was acknowledged that systems are complex networks of inter-relationships, which links to the recent emphasis on complex adaptive systems highlighted in the implementation paper that sits alongside this paper. A ‘paradigmatic leap’ in service designed and delivery is required. Literature on outcomes for young carers is more limited but growing and identifies long-term impacts of substantial caring on development and opportunities into adulthood. Separate work is underway focusing on young carers relating to the Act.

    KW - carers

    KW - care programmes

    KW - young carers

    UR - http://www.gov.scot/Topics/Health/Support-Social-Care/Unpaid-Carers/Implementation/UsefulResources

    M3 - Commissioned report

    BT - Review of Evidence on Personal Outcomes Relevant to the Carers (Scotland) Act 2016

    CY - Edinburgh

    ER -