Results from the Scottish national HAI prevalence survey

J. Reilly, S. Stewart, G.M. Allardice, A. Noone, C. Robertson, A. Walker, S. Coubrough, The Scottish Executive Health Department HAI Task Force (Funder)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

A national point prevalence survey was undertaken over the period of one calendar year in Scotland from October 2005 to October 2006. The prevalence of healthcare-associated infection (HAI) was 9.5% in acute hospitals and 7.3% in non-acute hospitals. The highest prevalence of HAI in acute hospital inpatients was found in the following specialties: care of the elderly (11.9%), surgery (11.2%), medicine (9.6%) and orthopaedics (9.2%). The lowest prevalence was found in obstetrics (0.9%). The most common types of HAI in acute hospital inpatients were: urinary tract infections (17.9% of all HAI), surgical site infections (15.9%) and gastrointestinal infections (15.4%). In non-acute hospitals one in ten inpatients in two specialties (combined) medicine (11.4%) and care of the elderly (7.8%) was found to have HAI, and one in 20 inpatients in psychiatry (5.0%) had HAI. In non-acute hospital patients, urinary tract infections were frequent (28.1% of all HAI) and similarly skin and soft tissue infection (26.8% of all HAI). When combined, these two HAI types affected 4% of all the inpatients in non-acute hospitals. This is the first survey of its kind in Scotland and describes the burden of HAI at a national level.
LanguageEnglish
Pages62-68
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Hospital Infection
Volume69
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2008

Fingerprint

Cross Infection
Inpatients
Scotland
Urinary Tract Infections
Medicine
Surveys and Questionnaires
Surgical Wound Infection
Soft Tissue Infections
Obstetrics
Orthopedics
Psychiatry
Skin

Keywords

  • prevalence
  • survey
  • healthcare-associated infection
  • nosocomial
  • infection

Cite this

Reilly, J., Stewart, S., Allardice, G. M., Noone, A., Robertson, C., Walker, A., ... The Scottish Executive Health Department HAI Task Force (Funder) (2008). Results from the Scottish national HAI prevalence survey. Journal of Hospital Infection, 69(1), 62-68. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhin.2008.02.019
Reilly, J. ; Stewart, S. ; Allardice, G.M. ; Noone, A. ; Robertson, C. ; Walker, A. ; Coubrough, S. ; The Scottish Executive Health Department HAI Task Force (Funder). / Results from the Scottish national HAI prevalence survey. In: Journal of Hospital Infection. 2008 ; Vol. 69, No. 1. pp. 62-68.
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Reilly, J, Stewart, S, Allardice, GM, Noone, A, Robertson, C, Walker, A, Coubrough, S & The Scottish Executive Health Department HAI Task Force (Funder) 2008, 'Results from the Scottish national HAI prevalence survey' Journal of Hospital Infection, vol. 69, no. 1, pp. 62-68. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhin.2008.02.019

Results from the Scottish national HAI prevalence survey. / Reilly, J.; Stewart, S.; Allardice, G.M.; Noone, A.; Robertson, C.; Walker, A.; Coubrough, S.; The Scottish Executive Health Department HAI Task Force (Funder).

In: Journal of Hospital Infection, Vol. 69, No. 1, 05.2008, p. 62-68.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Stewart, S.

AU - Allardice, G.M.

AU - Noone, A.

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AB - A national point prevalence survey was undertaken over the period of one calendar year in Scotland from October 2005 to October 2006. The prevalence of healthcare-associated infection (HAI) was 9.5% in acute hospitals and 7.3% in non-acute hospitals. The highest prevalence of HAI in acute hospital inpatients was found in the following specialties: care of the elderly (11.9%), surgery (11.2%), medicine (9.6%) and orthopaedics (9.2%). The lowest prevalence was found in obstetrics (0.9%). The most common types of HAI in acute hospital inpatients were: urinary tract infections (17.9% of all HAI), surgical site infections (15.9%) and gastrointestinal infections (15.4%). In non-acute hospitals one in ten inpatients in two specialties (combined) medicine (11.4%) and care of the elderly (7.8%) was found to have HAI, and one in 20 inpatients in psychiatry (5.0%) had HAI. In non-acute hospital patients, urinary tract infections were frequent (28.1% of all HAI) and similarly skin and soft tissue infection (26.8% of all HAI). When combined, these two HAI types affected 4% of all the inpatients in non-acute hospitals. This is the first survey of its kind in Scotland and describes the burden of HAI at a national level.

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