Resistivity of non-crystalline carbon in the 1-100eV range

A P L Robinson, H Schmitz, P McKenna

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A resistivity model for non-crystalline, solid-density carbon and hydrocarbons is presented for such materials heated by short-pulse, ultra-intense lasers. Electron-impact excitation of C atoms and ions was included in this model,and calculation of resistivity curves with and without accounting for excitations indicates that excitations contribute >50% of the resistivity in the 3–20 eV range. This implies that electron-impact excitations make a similar contribution to electron-ion scattering, and thus models not accounting for electron-impact excitation may underestimate the resistivity of dense plasmas in this temperature range.
LanguageEnglish
Article number083045
Number of pages10
JournalNew Journal of Physics
Volume17
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 24 Aug 2015

Fingerprint

electrical resistivity
carbon
electron impact
excitation
dense plasmas
ion scattering
electron scattering
hydrocarbons
curves
pulses
lasers
atoms
ions
temperature

Keywords

  • non-crystalline carbon
  • hydrocarbons
  • lasers
  • resistivity curves

Cite this

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title = "Resistivity of non-crystalline carbon in the 1-100eV range",
abstract = "A resistivity model for non-crystalline, solid-density carbon and hydrocarbons is presented for such materials heated by short-pulse, ultra-intense lasers. Electron-impact excitation of C atoms and ions was included in this model,and calculation of resistivity curves with and without accounting for excitations indicates that excitations contribute >50{\%} of the resistivity in the 3–20 eV range. This implies that electron-impact excitations make a similar contribution to electron-ion scattering, and thus models not accounting for electron-impact excitation may underestimate the resistivity of dense plasmas in this temperature range.",
keywords = "non-crystalline carbon, hydrocarbons, lasers, resistivity curves",
author = "Robinson, {A P L} and H Schmitz and P McKenna",
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Resistivity of non-crystalline carbon in the 1-100eV range. / Robinson, A P L; Schmitz, H; McKenna, P.

In: New Journal of Physics, Vol. 17, 083045, 24.08.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Resistivity of non-crystalline carbon in the 1-100eV range

AU - Robinson, A P L

AU - Schmitz, H

AU - McKenna, P

PY - 2015/8/24

Y1 - 2015/8/24

N2 - A resistivity model for non-crystalline, solid-density carbon and hydrocarbons is presented for such materials heated by short-pulse, ultra-intense lasers. Electron-impact excitation of C atoms and ions was included in this model,and calculation of resistivity curves with and without accounting for excitations indicates that excitations contribute >50% of the resistivity in the 3–20 eV range. This implies that electron-impact excitations make a similar contribution to electron-ion scattering, and thus models not accounting for electron-impact excitation may underestimate the resistivity of dense plasmas in this temperature range.

AB - A resistivity model for non-crystalline, solid-density carbon and hydrocarbons is presented for such materials heated by short-pulse, ultra-intense lasers. Electron-impact excitation of C atoms and ions was included in this model,and calculation of resistivity curves with and without accounting for excitations indicates that excitations contribute >50% of the resistivity in the 3–20 eV range. This implies that electron-impact excitations make a similar contribution to electron-ion scattering, and thus models not accounting for electron-impact excitation may underestimate the resistivity of dense plasmas in this temperature range.

KW - non-crystalline carbon

KW - hydrocarbons

KW - lasers

KW - resistivity curves

UR - http://iopscience.iop.org/1367-2630

U2 - 10.1088/1367-2630/17/8/083045

DO - 10.1088/1367-2630/17/8/083045

M3 - Article

VL - 17

JO - New Journal of Physics

T2 - New Journal of Physics

JF - New Journal of Physics

SN - 1367-2630

M1 - 083045

ER -