Relationships between flavour, lipid composition and antioxidants in organic, free-range and conventional chicken breasts from modelling

K. Jahan, A. Paterson, C.M. Spickett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Consumers expect organic, free-range and corn-fed chicken to be nutritionally wholesome and have premium flavour characters. Interrelationships between flavour, fatty acids and antioxidants of retailed breasts were explored using simple correlations and chemometrics. Saturated fatty acid C16:0, and n-6 polyunsaturated C20:4 and C22:4 contents were correlated with lipid oxidation products (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances) and in partial least-squares regression (PLS1) with 32 high-resonance gas chromatography (flame ionization) flavour components (r 2>0.90), and also linked (r 2>0.80) to antioxidants (-tocopherol, glutathione and catalase). A further 10 high-resonance gas chromatography nitrogen phosphorus detector flavour components were correlated (r 2>0.85) with C18:3(n-3) content. Chicken character was correlated with C18:3(n-3), and C18:3(n-6) inversely with oily, off-flavour and lipid oxidation. Sweet, fruity and oily aromas were linked in PLS1 with 13 specific fatty acids (r 2>0.6), and bland taste with total summed (six) fatty acid fractions (r 2>0.81). Specific antioxidants were correlated with sweet, fruity and chicken aromas, and -tocopherol inversely with lipid oxidation. PLS2 confirmed relationships between fatty acid composition, antioxidants and the subsets of 32 and 10 flavour components. Clear relationships were thus observed between lipid and antioxidant compositions and flavour in chicken breast meat.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)229-243
Number of pages14
JournalInternational Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition
Volume57
Issue number3-4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2006

Fingerprint

lipid composition
breasts
Chickens
Breast
Fatty Acids
flavor
Antioxidants
chickens
Lipids
antioxidants
Tocopherols
lipid peroxidation
Gas Chromatography
fatty acids
tocopherols
Flame Ionization
gas chromatography
odors
Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances
Least-Squares Analysis

Keywords

  • fatty-acid-composition
  • alpha-tocopherol
  • sensory quality
  • meat quality
  • vitamin-e
  • supplementation
  • oxidation
  • components
  • organic
  • free-range
  • chicken

Cite this

@article{54b3d63c440546bcb80c5559a85f6b83,
title = "Relationships between flavour, lipid composition and antioxidants in organic, free-range and conventional chicken breasts from modelling",
abstract = "Consumers expect organic, free-range and corn-fed chicken to be nutritionally wholesome and have premium flavour characters. Interrelationships between flavour, fatty acids and antioxidants of retailed breasts were explored using simple correlations and chemometrics. Saturated fatty acid C16:0, and n-6 polyunsaturated C20:4 and C22:4 contents were correlated with lipid oxidation products (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances) and in partial least-squares regression (PLS1) with 32 high-resonance gas chromatography (flame ionization) flavour components (r 2>0.90), and also linked (r 2>0.80) to antioxidants (-tocopherol, glutathione and catalase). A further 10 high-resonance gas chromatography nitrogen phosphorus detector flavour components were correlated (r 2>0.85) with C18:3(n-3) content. Chicken character was correlated with C18:3(n-3), and C18:3(n-6) inversely with oily, off-flavour and lipid oxidation. Sweet, fruity and oily aromas were linked in PLS1 with 13 specific fatty acids (r 2>0.6), and bland taste with total summed (six) fatty acid fractions (r 2>0.81). Specific antioxidants were correlated with sweet, fruity and chicken aromas, and -tocopherol inversely with lipid oxidation. PLS2 confirmed relationships between fatty acid composition, antioxidants and the subsets of 32 and 10 flavour components. Clear relationships were thus observed between lipid and antioxidant compositions and flavour in chicken breast meat.",
keywords = "fatty-acid-composition, alpha-tocopherol, sensory quality, meat quality, vitamin-e, supplementation, oxidation, components, organic, free-range, chicken",
author = "K. Jahan and A. Paterson and C.M. Spickett",
year = "2006",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1080/09637480600801795",
language = "English",
volume = "57",
pages = "229--243",
journal = "International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition",
issn = "0963-7486",
number = "3-4",

}

Relationships between flavour, lipid composition and antioxidants in organic, free-range and conventional chicken breasts from modelling. / Jahan, K.; Paterson, A.; Spickett, C.M.

In: International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition, Vol. 57, No. 3-4, 05.2006, p. 229-243.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Relationships between flavour, lipid composition and antioxidants in organic, free-range and conventional chicken breasts from modelling

AU - Jahan, K.

AU - Paterson, A.

AU - Spickett, C.M.

PY - 2006/5

Y1 - 2006/5

N2 - Consumers expect organic, free-range and corn-fed chicken to be nutritionally wholesome and have premium flavour characters. Interrelationships between flavour, fatty acids and antioxidants of retailed breasts were explored using simple correlations and chemometrics. Saturated fatty acid C16:0, and n-6 polyunsaturated C20:4 and C22:4 contents were correlated with lipid oxidation products (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances) and in partial least-squares regression (PLS1) with 32 high-resonance gas chromatography (flame ionization) flavour components (r 2>0.90), and also linked (r 2>0.80) to antioxidants (-tocopherol, glutathione and catalase). A further 10 high-resonance gas chromatography nitrogen phosphorus detector flavour components were correlated (r 2>0.85) with C18:3(n-3) content. Chicken character was correlated with C18:3(n-3), and C18:3(n-6) inversely with oily, off-flavour and lipid oxidation. Sweet, fruity and oily aromas were linked in PLS1 with 13 specific fatty acids (r 2>0.6), and bland taste with total summed (six) fatty acid fractions (r 2>0.81). Specific antioxidants were correlated with sweet, fruity and chicken aromas, and -tocopherol inversely with lipid oxidation. PLS2 confirmed relationships between fatty acid composition, antioxidants and the subsets of 32 and 10 flavour components. Clear relationships were thus observed between lipid and antioxidant compositions and flavour in chicken breast meat.

AB - Consumers expect organic, free-range and corn-fed chicken to be nutritionally wholesome and have premium flavour characters. Interrelationships between flavour, fatty acids and antioxidants of retailed breasts were explored using simple correlations and chemometrics. Saturated fatty acid C16:0, and n-6 polyunsaturated C20:4 and C22:4 contents were correlated with lipid oxidation products (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances) and in partial least-squares regression (PLS1) with 32 high-resonance gas chromatography (flame ionization) flavour components (r 2>0.90), and also linked (r 2>0.80) to antioxidants (-tocopherol, glutathione and catalase). A further 10 high-resonance gas chromatography nitrogen phosphorus detector flavour components were correlated (r 2>0.85) with C18:3(n-3) content. Chicken character was correlated with C18:3(n-3), and C18:3(n-6) inversely with oily, off-flavour and lipid oxidation. Sweet, fruity and oily aromas were linked in PLS1 with 13 specific fatty acids (r 2>0.6), and bland taste with total summed (six) fatty acid fractions (r 2>0.81). Specific antioxidants were correlated with sweet, fruity and chicken aromas, and -tocopherol inversely with lipid oxidation. PLS2 confirmed relationships between fatty acid composition, antioxidants and the subsets of 32 and 10 flavour components. Clear relationships were thus observed between lipid and antioxidant compositions and flavour in chicken breast meat.

KW - fatty-acid-composition

KW - alpha-tocopherol

KW - sensory quality

KW - meat quality

KW - vitamin-e

KW - supplementation

KW - oxidation

KW - components

KW - organic

KW - free-range

KW - chicken

UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09637480600801795

U2 - 10.1080/09637480600801795

DO - 10.1080/09637480600801795

M3 - Article

VL - 57

SP - 229

EP - 243

JO - International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition

JF - International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition

SN - 0963-7486

IS - 3-4

ER -