Relationship between antibiotic- and disinfectant-resistance profiles in bacteria harvested from tap water

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Chlorination is commonly used to control levels of bacteria in drinking water; however, viable bacteria may remain due to chlorine resistance. What may be concerning is that surviving bacteria, due to co-selection factors, may also have increased resistance to common antibiotics. This would pose a public health risk as it could link resistant bacteria in the natural environment to human population. Here, we investigated the relationship between chlorine- and antibiotic-resistances by harvesting 148 surviving bacteria from chlorinated drinking-water systems and compared their susceptibilities against chlorine disinfectants and antibiotics. Twenty-two genera were isolated, including members of Paenibacillus, Burkholderia, Escherichia, Sphingomonas and Dermacoccus species. Weak (but significant) correlations were found between chlorine-tolerance and minimum inhibitory concentrations against the antibiotics tetracycline, sulfamethoxazole and amoxicillin, but not against ciprofloxacin; this suggest that chlorine-tolerant bacteria are more likely to also be antibiotic resistant. Further, antibiotic-resistant bacteria survived longer than antibiotic-sensitive organisms when exposed to free chlorine in a contact-time assay; however, there were little differences in susceptibility when exposed to monochloramine. Irrespective of antibiotic-resistance, spore-forming bacteria had higher tolerance against disinfection compounds. The presence of chlorine-resistant bacteria surviving in drinking-water systems may also carry additional risk of antibiotic resistance.
LanguageEnglish
Pages132-141
Number of pages10
JournalChemosphere
Volume152
Early online date8 Mar 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2016

Fingerprint

Disinfectants
Antibiotics
antibiotics
Chlorine
Bacteria
Anti-Bacterial Agents
chlorine
bacterium
Water
antibiotic resistance
Potable water
Drinking Water
water
drinking water
tolerance
Public risks
disinfectant
Sulfamethoxazole
Disinfection
Chlorination

Keywords

  • antimicrobial resistance
  • disinfection
  • susceptibility
  • drinking water
  • drinking water safety

Cite this

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title = "Relationship between antibiotic- and disinfectant-resistance profiles in bacteria harvested from tap water",
abstract = "Chlorination is commonly used to control levels of bacteria in drinking water; however, viable bacteria may remain due to chlorine resistance. What may be concerning is that surviving bacteria, due to co-selection factors, may also have increased resistance to common antibiotics. This would pose a public health risk as it could link resistant bacteria in the natural environment to human population. Here, we investigated the relationship between chlorine- and antibiotic-resistances by harvesting 148 surviving bacteria from chlorinated drinking-water systems and compared their susceptibilities against chlorine disinfectants and antibiotics. Twenty-two genera were isolated, including members of Paenibacillus, Burkholderia, Escherichia, Sphingomonas and Dermacoccus species. Weak (but significant) correlations were found between chlorine-tolerance and minimum inhibitory concentrations against the antibiotics tetracycline, sulfamethoxazole and amoxicillin, but not against ciprofloxacin; this suggest that chlorine-tolerant bacteria are more likely to also be antibiotic resistant. Further, antibiotic-resistant bacteria survived longer than antibiotic-sensitive organisms when exposed to free chlorine in a contact-time assay; however, there were little differences in susceptibility when exposed to monochloramine. Irrespective of antibiotic-resistance, spore-forming bacteria had higher tolerance against disinfection compounds. The presence of chlorine-resistant bacteria surviving in drinking-water systems may also carry additional risk of antibiotic resistance.",
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Relationship between antibiotic- and disinfectant-resistance profiles in bacteria harvested from tap water. / Khan, Sadia; Beattie, Tara K.; Knapp, Charles W.

In: Chemosphere, Vol. 152, 01.06.2016, p. 132-141.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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