Relation between breast cancer and high glycemic index or glycemic load: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies

Patrick Mullie, Alice Koechlin, Mathieu Boniol, Philippe Autier, Peter Boyle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Breast cancer is the commonest form of cancer in women worldwide. It has been suggested that chronic hyperinsulinemia associated with insulin resistance plays a role in breast cancer etiology. To test the hyperinsulinemia hypothesis, a dietary pattern associated with a high glycemic index and glycemic load, both proxies for chronic hyperinsulinemia, should be associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. A meta-analysis restricted to prospective cohort studies was undertaken using a random effects model with tests for statistical significance, publication bias and heterogeneity. The metric for analysis was the risk of breast cancer in the highest relative to the lowest glycemic index and glycemic load dietary pattern. A dietary pattern with a high glycemic index was associated with a summary relative risk (SRR) of 1.05 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.11), and a high glycemic load with a SRR of 1.06 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.13). Adjustments for body mass index [BMI], physical activity and other lifestyle factors did not influence the SRR, nor did menopausal status and estrogen receptor status of the tumor. In conclusion, the current evidence supports a modest association between a dietary pattern with high glycemic index or glycemic load and the risk of breast cancer.

LanguageEnglish
Pages152-159
Number of pages8
JournalCritical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition
Volume56
Issue number1
Early online date6 Mar 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Jan 2016

Fingerprint

Glycemic Index
glycemic index
cohort studies
meta-analysis
breast neoplasms
Meta-Analysis
Cohort Studies
eating habits
Prospective Studies
hyperinsulinemia
Breast Neoplasms
relative risk
Hyperinsulinism
menopause
neoplasms
Publication Bias
insulin resistance
physical activity
Insulin
lifestyle

Keywords

  • hyperinsulinemia
  • nutritional epidemiology
  • prevention

Cite this

@article{f5cd160aff344c03a3ea0b0cbc6da591,
title = "Relation between breast cancer and high glycemic index or glycemic load: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies",
abstract = "Breast cancer is the commonest form of cancer in women worldwide. It has been suggested that chronic hyperinsulinemia associated with insulin resistance plays a role in breast cancer etiology. To test the hyperinsulinemia hypothesis, a dietary pattern associated with a high glycemic index and glycemic load, both proxies for chronic hyperinsulinemia, should be associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. A meta-analysis restricted to prospective cohort studies was undertaken using a random effects model with tests for statistical significance, publication bias and heterogeneity. The metric for analysis was the risk of breast cancer in the highest relative to the lowest glycemic index and glycemic load dietary pattern. A dietary pattern with a high glycemic index was associated with a summary relative risk (SRR) of 1.05 (95{\%} CI: 1.00, 1.11), and a high glycemic load with a SRR of 1.06 (95{\%} CI: 1.00, 1.13). Adjustments for body mass index [BMI], physical activity and other lifestyle factors did not influence the SRR, nor did menopausal status and estrogen receptor status of the tumor. In conclusion, the current evidence supports a modest association between a dietary pattern with high glycemic index or glycemic load and the risk of breast cancer.",
keywords = "hyperinsulinemia, nutritional epidemiology, prevention",
author = "Patrick Mullie and Alice Koechlin and Mathieu Boniol and Philippe Autier and Peter Boyle",
note = "This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition on 06/03/2015, available online: http://wwww.tandfonline.com/10.1080/10408398.2012.718723.",
year = "2016",
month = "1",
day = "2",
doi = "10.1080/10408398.2012.718723",
language = "English",
volume = "56",
pages = "152--159",
journal = "Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition",
issn = "1040-8398",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Relation between breast cancer and high glycemic index or glycemic load

T2 - Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition

AU - Mullie, Patrick

AU - Koechlin, Alice

AU - Boniol, Mathieu

AU - Autier, Philippe

AU - Boyle, Peter

N1 - This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition on 06/03/2015, available online: http://wwww.tandfonline.com/10.1080/10408398.2012.718723.

PY - 2016/1/2

Y1 - 2016/1/2

N2 - Breast cancer is the commonest form of cancer in women worldwide. It has been suggested that chronic hyperinsulinemia associated with insulin resistance plays a role in breast cancer etiology. To test the hyperinsulinemia hypothesis, a dietary pattern associated with a high glycemic index and glycemic load, both proxies for chronic hyperinsulinemia, should be associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. A meta-analysis restricted to prospective cohort studies was undertaken using a random effects model with tests for statistical significance, publication bias and heterogeneity. The metric for analysis was the risk of breast cancer in the highest relative to the lowest glycemic index and glycemic load dietary pattern. A dietary pattern with a high glycemic index was associated with a summary relative risk (SRR) of 1.05 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.11), and a high glycemic load with a SRR of 1.06 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.13). Adjustments for body mass index [BMI], physical activity and other lifestyle factors did not influence the SRR, nor did menopausal status and estrogen receptor status of the tumor. In conclusion, the current evidence supports a modest association between a dietary pattern with high glycemic index or glycemic load and the risk of breast cancer.

AB - Breast cancer is the commonest form of cancer in women worldwide. It has been suggested that chronic hyperinsulinemia associated with insulin resistance plays a role in breast cancer etiology. To test the hyperinsulinemia hypothesis, a dietary pattern associated with a high glycemic index and glycemic load, both proxies for chronic hyperinsulinemia, should be associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. A meta-analysis restricted to prospective cohort studies was undertaken using a random effects model with tests for statistical significance, publication bias and heterogeneity. The metric for analysis was the risk of breast cancer in the highest relative to the lowest glycemic index and glycemic load dietary pattern. A dietary pattern with a high glycemic index was associated with a summary relative risk (SRR) of 1.05 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.11), and a high glycemic load with a SRR of 1.06 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.13). Adjustments for body mass index [BMI], physical activity and other lifestyle factors did not influence the SRR, nor did menopausal status and estrogen receptor status of the tumor. In conclusion, the current evidence supports a modest association between a dietary pattern with high glycemic index or glycemic load and the risk of breast cancer.

KW - hyperinsulinemia

KW - nutritional epidemiology

KW - prevention

UR - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10408398.2012.718723

U2 - 10.1080/10408398.2012.718723

DO - 10.1080/10408398.2012.718723

M3 - Article

VL - 56

SP - 152

EP - 159

JO - Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition

JF - Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition

SN - 1040-8398

IS - 1

ER -