Reimagining the doctor-patient relationship

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    Abstract

    Doctors, along with perhaps lawyers and clerics, are the archetypal professionals. Those of us born well before the twenty-first century are familiar with role models of friendly but authoritative men (and they were all men) saving lives through the application of their encyclopaedic scientific knowledge applied to the grateful, deferent patient before them (Dingwall and Lewis 1983). Doctors were at the pinnacle of the career ladder, the scaling of which required the highest academic performance which was rewarded by both high social status and good pay. We looked to doctors to make us well in our hours of need, and held them in the greatest respect (Porter 2002). However, this doesn’t really tell the whole story.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationReimagining the Human Service Relationship
    EditorsJaber F. Gubrium, Tone Alm Andreassen, Per Koren Solvang
    Place of PublicationNew York
    Pages283-300
    Publication statusPublished - 31 Jul 2016

    Fingerprint

    Career Mobility
    Clergy
    Lawyers
    role model
    scaling
    lawyer
    twenty-first century
    social status
    respect
    career
    knowledge
    performance

    Keywords

    • doctor-patient relationship
    • healthcare
    • society
    • expert patient model
    • care
    • patient's wellbeing

    Cite this

    Greener, I. (2016). Reimagining the doctor-patient relationship. In J. F. Gubrium, T. A. Andreassen, & P. K. Solvang (Eds.), Reimagining the Human Service Relationship (pp. 283-300). New York.
    Greener, Ian. / Reimagining the doctor-patient relationship. Reimagining the Human Service Relationship. editor / Jaber F. Gubrium ; Tone Alm Andreassen ; Per Koren Solvang. New York, 2016. pp. 283-300
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    Greener, I 2016, Reimagining the doctor-patient relationship. in JF Gubrium, TA Andreassen & PK Solvang (eds), Reimagining the Human Service Relationship. New York, pp. 283-300.

    Reimagining the doctor-patient relationship. / Greener, Ian.

    Reimagining the Human Service Relationship. ed. / Jaber F. Gubrium; Tone Alm Andreassen; Per Koren Solvang. New York, 2016. p. 283-300.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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    Greener I. Reimagining the doctor-patient relationship. In Gubrium JF, Andreassen TA, Solvang PK, editors, Reimagining the Human Service Relationship. New York. 2016. p. 283-300