Regression of melanoma following intravenous injection of plumbagin entrapped in transferrin-conjugated, lipid–polymer hybrid nanoparticles

Intouch Sakpakdeejaroen, Sukrut Somani, Partha Laskar, Margaret Mullin, Christine Dufès

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Background: Plumbagin, a naphthoquinone extracted from the officinal leadwort presenting promising anti-cancer properties, has its therapeutic potential limited by its inability to reach tumors in a specific way at a therapeutic concentration following systemic injection. The purpose of this study is to assess whether a novel tumor-targeted, lipid–polymer hybrid nanoparticle formulation of plumbagin would suppress the growth of B16-F10 melanoma in vitro and in vivo.
Methods: Novel lipid–polymer hybrid nanoparticles entrapping plumbagin and conjugated with transferrin, whose receptors are present in abundance on many cancer cells, have been developed. Their cellular uptake, anti-proliferative and apoptosis efficacy were assessed on various cancer cell lines in vitro. Their therapeutic efficacy was evaluated in vivo after tail vein injection to mice bearing B16-F10 melanoma tumors.
Results: The transferrin-bearing lipid–polymer hybrid nanoparticles loaded with plumbagin resulted in the disappearance of 40% of B16-F10 tumors and regression of 10% of the tumors following intravenous administration. They were well tolerated by the mice.
Conclusion: These therapeutic effects therefore make transferrin-bearing lipid–polymer hybrid nanoparticles entrapping plumbagin a highly promising anti-cancer nanomedicine.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2615-2631
Number of pages16
JournalInternational Journal of Nanomedicine
Volume16
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 6 Apr 2021

Keywords

  • plumbagin
  • transferrin
  • tumor targeting
  • lipid–polymer hybrid nanoparticles
  • cancer therapy

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Regression of melanoma following intravenous injection of plumbagin entrapped in transferrin-conjugated, lipid–polymer hybrid nanoparticles'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this