Reconsidering the technologies of intellectual inquiry in curriculum design

Cristina Costa, Lisa Harris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper reports on the design and delivery of classroom pedagogies and students’ engagement with it in two different UK universities. Under the banner of curriculum design and Bourdieu’s curriculum principles, the study set out to create modules that provided students with an interdisciplinary perspective on how the web is changing the way citizens live, interact and learn. Focusing on the idea that the web is becoming a tool of intellectual inquiry and an instrument of reproduction of knowledge inequality, the goal of this research was to transform knowledge practices by encouraging a learning habitus that relies on knowing how to learn rather than becoming “knowledgeable”. The paper concludes that the Bourdieuian perspective on curriculum design still holds currency in the digital age, given that it shares an epistemology of practice similar to that advocated by a digital participatory culture. We also offer a critique to our approach, using Bourdieu’s logic of practice to examine how education as a field displays (hidden) rules that students embody as their learning habitus. As students’ learning practices become doxified through their educational trajectories, learners find it difficult to engage with a curriculum that aims to diversify pedagogical structures and reflect a changing society.
LanguageEnglish
Pages559-577
Number of pages19
JournalCurriculum Journal
Volume28
Issue number4
Early online date31 Mar 2017
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 31 Mar 2017

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curriculum
student
learning
currency
epistemology
citizen
classroom
university
education
Society

Keywords

  • Bourdieu
  • curriculum design
  • participatory web
  • habitus
  • digital culture
  • higher education
  • pedagogies
  • digital age
  • internet

Cite this

Costa, Cristina ; Harris, Lisa. / Reconsidering the technologies of intellectual inquiry in curriculum design. In: Curriculum Journal. 2017 ; Vol. 28, No. 4. pp. 559-577.
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Reconsidering the technologies of intellectual inquiry in curriculum design. / Costa, Cristina; Harris, Lisa.

In: Curriculum Journal, Vol. 28, No. 4, 31.03.2017, p. 559-577.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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