Re-viewing routines through a Pragmatist lens

Barbara Simpson, Philippe Lorino

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    Abstract

    The practice-based view that currently dominates the routines literature is based on an ostensive-performative duality. However, from the perspective of process philosophy, this duality, or at least the manner in which it is applied, presents four key obstacles to a more processual theorization of routines. This chapter offers an alternative approach that builds on Pragmatist philosophy, especially the ideas of John Dewey and George Herbert Mead, which inform a performative rather than a representational approach to understanding ordinary everyday actions. The argument provides an account of the social and temporal situatedness of human conduct in terms of the inter-related processes of habit, inquiry, and conversational trans-actions.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationOrganizational Routines
    Subtitle of host publicationHow They Are Created, Maintained, and Changed
    EditorsJennifer Howard-Grenville, Claus Rerup, Ann Langley, Haridimos Tsoukas
    Place of PublicationOxford
    PublisherOxford University Press
    Pages47-70
    Number of pages14
    ISBN (Print)9780198759485
    Publication statusPublished - 24 Mar 2016

    Publication series

    NamePerspectives on Process Organization Studies
    PublisherOxford University Press
    Volume6

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    Keywords

    • Pragmatism
    • performativity
    • temporality
    • habit
    • inquiry
    • conversational trans-action

    Cite this

    Simpson, B., & Lorino, P. (2016). Re-viewing routines through a Pragmatist lens. In J. Howard-Grenville, C. Rerup, A. Langley, & H. Tsoukas (Eds.), Organizational Routines: How They Are Created, Maintained, and Changed (pp. 47-70). (Perspectives on Process Organization Studies; Vol. 6). Oxford: Oxford University Press.