Rapid prototyping of poly(dimethoxysiloxane) dot arrays by dip-pen nanolithography

Aaron Hernandez-Santana, Eleanore Irvine, Karen Faulds, Duncan Graham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We report the first direct patterning of elastomeric PDMS structures by dip-pen nanolithography (DPN). This method involves the use of a cantilever tip to transfer a PDMS ink onto a silicon dioxide surface to create dot array patterns which are then cross-linked and bonded irreversibly to the substrate. The chemical composition of the PDMS structures deposited by DPN was characterised by Raman microspectroscopy to provide an insight into the ink transfer process. This technique offers a significant advance in the ability to rapidly and easily produce programmable surface features from a widely used polymer for use in a variety of applications.

LanguageEnglish
Pages211-215
Number of pages5
JournalChemical Science
Volume2
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Fingerprint

Nanolithography
Rapid prototyping
Ink
Silicon Dioxide
Polymers
Substrates
Chemical analysis
elastomeric

Keywords

  • microfluidic devices
  • molecular transport
  • nanostructures
  • fabrication
  • TIC - Bionanotechnology

Cite this

Hernandez-Santana, Aaron ; Irvine, Eleanore ; Faulds, Karen ; Graham, Duncan. / Rapid prototyping of poly(dimethoxysiloxane) dot arrays by dip-pen nanolithography. In: Chemical Science. 2011 ; Vol. 2, No. 2. pp. 211-215.
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Rapid prototyping of poly(dimethoxysiloxane) dot arrays by dip-pen nanolithography. / Hernandez-Santana, Aaron; Irvine, Eleanore; Faulds, Karen; Graham, Duncan.

In: Chemical Science, Vol. 2, No. 2, 2011, p. 211-215.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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