Quantitative risk assessment for the acquisition of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in dogs.

J. Heller, G.T. Innocent, Louise Anne Kelly, Stuart Reid, D.J. Mellor

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an emerging companion animal infection with poorly described zoonotic potential. This study presents a quantitative risk assessment in the form of a second order stochastic simulation model with accompanying logistic regression sensitivity analysis that aims to define the most important factors for MRSA acquisition in dogs. Key findings are that both veterinary and non-veterinary routes of acquisition of MRSA are likely to be relevant for dogs. The most influential predictors for MRSA acquisition in dogs were found to be exposure to MRSA positive family members and attendance at veterinary clinics. Variations in the probability of transmission of MRSA from the (non-veterinary and veterinary) environment and from humans (family members and veterinary staff) were also found to be highly influential for MRSA acquisition in dogs.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Society for Veterinary Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine Meeting 1st-3rd April 2009
EditorsJ.R. Newton, D.U. Pfeiffer
Place of PublicationRoslin, UK
Pages23-34
Number of pages12
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2009
EventSociety for Veterinary Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine - London, United Kingdom
Duration: 1 Apr 20093 Apr 2009

Conference

ConferenceSociety for Veterinary Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityLondon
Period1/04/093/04/09

Keywords

  • risk assessment
  • Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus
  • MRSA
  • dogs

Cite this

Heller, J., Innocent, G. T., Kelly, L. A., Reid, S., & Mellor, D. J. (2009). Quantitative risk assessment for the acquisition of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in dogs. In J. R. Newton, & D. U. Pfeiffer (Eds.), Proceedings of the Society for Veterinary Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine Meeting 1st-3rd April 2009 (pp. 23-34).