Quantifying sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit transitions in free-living environments using the activPAL thigh-worn activity monitor

Chris G. Pickford, Andrew H Findlow, Andy Kerr, Matthew Banger, Alexandra M. Clarke-Cornwell, Kristen L. Hollands, Terry Quinn, Malcolm H. Granat

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: Standing up, sitting down and walking require considerable effort and coordination, which are crucial indicators to rehabilitation (e.g. stroke), and in older populations may indicate the onset of frailty and physical and cognitive decline. Currently, there are few reports robustly quantifying sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit transitions in free-living environments. The aim of this study was to identify and quantify these transitions using the peak velocity of sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit transitions to determine if these velocities were different in a healthy cohort and a mobility-impaired population. Methods: Free-living sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit acceleration data were recorded from 21 healthy volunteers and 34 stroke survivors using activPAL3™ monitors over a one-week period. Thigh inclination velocity was calculated from these accelerometer data. Maximum velocities were compared between populations. Results: A total of 10,299 and 11,392 sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit transitions were recorded in healthy volunteers and stroke survivors, respectively. Healthy volunteers had significantly higher overall mean peak velocities for both transitions compared with stroke survivors [70.7°/s ± 52.2 versus 44.2°/s ± 28.0 for sit-to-stand, P < 0.001 and 74.7°/s ± 51.8 versus 46.0°/s ± 31.9 for stand-to-sit; P < 0.001]. Mean peak velocity of transition was associated with increased variation in peak velocity across both groups. Conclusion: There were significant differences in the mean peak velocity of sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit transitions between the groups. Variation in an individual's mean peak velocity may be associated with the ability to perform these transitions. This method could be used to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions following injury such as stroke, as well as monitor decline in functional ability.

LanguageEnglish
Pages140-146
Number of pages7
JournalGait and Posture
Volume73
Early online date12 Jul 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2019

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Thigh
Stroke
Healthy Volunteers
Population
Aptitude
Walking
Wounds and Injuries
Accelerometers
Patient rehabilitation

Keywords

  • activPAL
  • peak velocity
  • physical behaviour
  • stroke
  • sit-to-stand
  • stand-to-sit

Cite this

Pickford, Chris G. ; Findlow, Andrew H ; Kerr, Andy ; Banger, Matthew ; Clarke-Cornwell, Alexandra M. ; Hollands, Kristen L. ; Quinn, Terry ; Granat, Malcolm H. / Quantifying sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit transitions in free-living environments using the activPAL thigh-worn activity monitor. In: Gait and Posture. 2019 ; Vol. 73. pp. 140-146.
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abstract = "Purpose: Standing up, sitting down and walking require considerable effort and coordination, which are crucial indicators to rehabilitation (e.g. stroke), and in older populations may indicate the onset of frailty and physical and cognitive decline. Currently, there are few reports robustly quantifying sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit transitions in free-living environments. The aim of this study was to identify and quantify these transitions using the peak velocity of sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit transitions to determine if these velocities were different in a healthy cohort and a mobility-impaired population. Methods: Free-living sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit acceleration data were recorded from 21 healthy volunteers and 34 stroke survivors using activPAL3™ monitors over a one-week period. Thigh inclination velocity was calculated from these accelerometer data. Maximum velocities were compared between populations. Results: A total of 10,299 and 11,392 sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit transitions were recorded in healthy volunteers and stroke survivors, respectively. Healthy volunteers had significantly higher overall mean peak velocities for both transitions compared with stroke survivors [70.7°/s ± 52.2 versus 44.2°/s ± 28.0 for sit-to-stand, P < 0.001 and 74.7°/s ± 51.8 versus 46.0°/s ± 31.9 for stand-to-sit; P < 0.001]. Mean peak velocity of transition was associated with increased variation in peak velocity across both groups. Conclusion: There were significant differences in the mean peak velocity of sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit transitions between the groups. Variation in an individual's mean peak velocity may be associated with the ability to perform these transitions. This method could be used to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions following injury such as stroke, as well as monitor decline in functional ability.",
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Quantifying sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit transitions in free-living environments using the activPAL thigh-worn activity monitor. / Pickford, Chris G.; Findlow, Andrew H; Kerr, Andy; Banger, Matthew; Clarke-Cornwell, Alexandra M.; Hollands, Kristen L.; Quinn, Terry; Granat, Malcolm H.

In: Gait and Posture, Vol. 73, 01.09.2019, p. 140-146.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Quantifying sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit transitions in free-living environments using the activPAL thigh-worn activity monitor

AU - Pickford, Chris G.

AU - Findlow, Andrew H

AU - Kerr, Andy

AU - Banger, Matthew

AU - Clarke-Cornwell, Alexandra M.

AU - Hollands, Kristen L.

AU - Quinn, Terry

AU - Granat, Malcolm H.

PY - 2019/9/1

Y1 - 2019/9/1

N2 - Purpose: Standing up, sitting down and walking require considerable effort and coordination, which are crucial indicators to rehabilitation (e.g. stroke), and in older populations may indicate the onset of frailty and physical and cognitive decline. Currently, there are few reports robustly quantifying sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit transitions in free-living environments. The aim of this study was to identify and quantify these transitions using the peak velocity of sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit transitions to determine if these velocities were different in a healthy cohort and a mobility-impaired population. Methods: Free-living sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit acceleration data were recorded from 21 healthy volunteers and 34 stroke survivors using activPAL3™ monitors over a one-week period. Thigh inclination velocity was calculated from these accelerometer data. Maximum velocities were compared between populations. Results: A total of 10,299 and 11,392 sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit transitions were recorded in healthy volunteers and stroke survivors, respectively. Healthy volunteers had significantly higher overall mean peak velocities for both transitions compared with stroke survivors [70.7°/s ± 52.2 versus 44.2°/s ± 28.0 for sit-to-stand, P < 0.001 and 74.7°/s ± 51.8 versus 46.0°/s ± 31.9 for stand-to-sit; P < 0.001]. Mean peak velocity of transition was associated with increased variation in peak velocity across both groups. Conclusion: There were significant differences in the mean peak velocity of sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit transitions between the groups. Variation in an individual's mean peak velocity may be associated with the ability to perform these transitions. This method could be used to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions following injury such as stroke, as well as monitor decline in functional ability.

AB - Purpose: Standing up, sitting down and walking require considerable effort and coordination, which are crucial indicators to rehabilitation (e.g. stroke), and in older populations may indicate the onset of frailty and physical and cognitive decline. Currently, there are few reports robustly quantifying sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit transitions in free-living environments. The aim of this study was to identify and quantify these transitions using the peak velocity of sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit transitions to determine if these velocities were different in a healthy cohort and a mobility-impaired population. Methods: Free-living sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit acceleration data were recorded from 21 healthy volunteers and 34 stroke survivors using activPAL3™ monitors over a one-week period. Thigh inclination velocity was calculated from these accelerometer data. Maximum velocities were compared between populations. Results: A total of 10,299 and 11,392 sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit transitions were recorded in healthy volunteers and stroke survivors, respectively. Healthy volunteers had significantly higher overall mean peak velocities for both transitions compared with stroke survivors [70.7°/s ± 52.2 versus 44.2°/s ± 28.0 for sit-to-stand, P < 0.001 and 74.7°/s ± 51.8 versus 46.0°/s ± 31.9 for stand-to-sit; P < 0.001]. Mean peak velocity of transition was associated with increased variation in peak velocity across both groups. Conclusion: There were significant differences in the mean peak velocity of sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit transitions between the groups. Variation in an individual's mean peak velocity may be associated with the ability to perform these transitions. This method could be used to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions following injury such as stroke, as well as monitor decline in functional ability.

KW - activPAL

KW - peak velocity

KW - physical behaviour

KW - stroke

KW - sit-to-stand

KW - stand-to-sit

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