Pulsed UV-light in activation of poliovirus and adenovirus

Y. Lamont, A. Rzeutka, J.G. Anderson, S.J. MacGregor, M.J. Given, C. Deppe, N. Cook

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To study the pulsed ultraviolet (UV) inactivation of poliovirus and adenovirus.

Viral suspensions of 2 ml volume were exposed to varying numbers of polychromatic light pulses emitted from a xenon flashlamp. Ten pulses produced an approximately 4 log10 reduction in poliovirus titre, and no infectious poliovirus remained after 25 pulses. With adenovirus, 10 pulses resulted in an approximately 1 log10 reduction in infectivity. Adenovirus required 100 pulses to produce an approximately 3 log10 reduction in infectivity, and 200 pulses to produce a greater than 4 log10 reduction.

Adenovirus was more resistant to pulsed UV treatment than poliovirus although both viruses showed susceptibility to the treatment.

Pulsed UV-light treatment proved successful in the inactivation of poliovirus and adenovirus, and represents an alternative to continuous-wave UV treatment.
LanguageEnglish
Pages564-567
Number of pages4
JournalLetters in Applied Microbiology
Volume45
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2007

Fingerprint

Poliovirus
Ultraviolet Rays
Adenoviridae
Xenon
Suspensions
Viruses
Light

Keywords

  • adenovirus
  • poliovirus
  • pulsed
  • ultraviolet light
  • UV inactivation

Cite this

Lamont, Y. ; Rzeutka, A. ; Anderson, J.G. ; MacGregor, S.J. ; Given, M.J. ; Deppe, C. ; Cook, N. / Pulsed UV-light in activation of poliovirus and adenovirus. In: Letters in Applied Microbiology. 2007 ; Vol. 45, No. 5. pp. 564-567.
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Pulsed UV-light in activation of poliovirus and adenovirus. / Lamont, Y.; Rzeutka, A.; Anderson, J.G.; MacGregor, S.J.; Given, M.J.; Deppe, C.; Cook, N.

In: Letters in Applied Microbiology, Vol. 45, No. 5, 11.2007, p. 564-567.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Lamont, Y.

AU - Rzeutka, A.

AU - Anderson, J.G.

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AU - Deppe, C.

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AB - To study the pulsed ultraviolet (UV) inactivation of poliovirus and adenovirus. Viral suspensions of 2 ml volume were exposed to varying numbers of polychromatic light pulses emitted from a xenon flashlamp. Ten pulses produced an approximately 4 log10 reduction in poliovirus titre, and no infectious poliovirus remained after 25 pulses. With adenovirus, 10 pulses resulted in an approximately 1 log10 reduction in infectivity. Adenovirus required 100 pulses to produce an approximately 3 log10 reduction in infectivity, and 200 pulses to produce a greater than 4 log10 reduction. Adenovirus was more resistant to pulsed UV treatment than poliovirus although both viruses showed susceptibility to the treatment. Pulsed UV-light treatment proved successful in the inactivation of poliovirus and adenovirus, and represents an alternative to continuous-wave UV treatment.

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